Jury duty…and turn the car around

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Anthony Demangone Anthony Demangone is executive vice president and chief operating officer at the National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU). Demangone oversees day-to-day operations and manages the association’s education, membership, … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com/partner/nafcu Details Since I’ve been in the D.C. area, I’ve been called for jury duty three separate times.Ugh.I know it is practically an American past-time to find ways to escape jury duty.  A good friend of mine laughed when I told her about my most recent “call to service.”  She gave me quite a few tips on how to escape jury duty, or if I couldn’t, on how to answer questions to avoid serving for a given trial.It was tempting.  Jury duty in Arlington lasts up to four days.  No smart phones are permitted inside the courthouse.  Work is busy.  I have kids.  I have things to do!  Sound familiar?But then another friend of mine sent me this post (Building Personal Strength), which discusses small things and how they can affect one’s integrity.  He tells the story about a group of friends who grabbed a National Park map as they left a lodge, thinking it was free.  As they drove away, they discovered a $1 price tag on the back of the map.  A discussion started. Do they turn around and pay the dollar?  Do they keep driving?  They did the right thing at the end of the day.  Here’s why…“These are interesting situations. It’s only a dollar, or ten dollars, but you feel the need to make it right. Even though probably no one cares about it but you. I bet these pamphlets are taken by mistake all the time. The park probably makes a profit on them anyway. But I think it’s important to balance the scales. I think integrity is a two-way street. We do the right thing so we don’t hurt other people. We also do it for ourselves. We want to feel that we’re the kind of people who do what’s right. The truth is, if you cheat someone, even for only a dollar, your brain remembers that you did it. The information you’re carrying around subconsciously is that you cheat. This affects how you think about yourself. Your self-esteem. It can be a burden. It’s not worth a dollar. Or ten dollars. Or any amount of money.”That blog post was a wonderful reminder. Do the right thing, no matter what.  Even when no one is looking.  The world will be a better place, but you’ll be better off as well.  As managers, we often face dilemmas.  Here’s a question that I’ll make a point to ask myself first.What’s the right thing to do?last_img read more

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How to judge restorative justice

first_imgThe Criminal Justice Alliance (CJA) has called on the government to legislate to increase the use of restorative justice – the process that gives victims the chance to tell offenders the impact of their crime. It is designed to hold offenders to account for what they have done, help them understand its impact, take responsibility and make amends. In a report Restorative Justice: Time for Action, the CJA urges the government to put a duty on criminal justice agencies to offer restorative justice to all victims of crime pre-sentence, whenever an offender pleads guilty and agrees to participate in the process, and where it is appropriate and safe to do so. But is restorative justice the answer to overcrowded prisons and high reoffending rates, or is it a soft option used by the police to cut costs by not charging people and abused by defendants who want to escape prosecution or get a lighter sentence? The case put by the CJA for restorative justice is compelling. It says the overuse of prison has led to a rise in the prison population from under 45,000 in 1993 to 85,000 today. With 60% of prisons overcrowded, the system does not have the space or resources to engage meaningfully with prisoners. The result is high reoffending rates: 48.5% of ex-prisoners and 45% of those who have served a sentence of 12 months or less are convicted of a further offence within a year of release. ‘In spite of record spending, reoffending rates remain high and public confidence in the criminal justice system low,’ says the CJA. It suggests: ‘At a time of austerity, resources need to be focused on responses to offending that are efficient and effective, and which also meet the needs of victims and communities.’ Currently, restorative justice can be used as an alternative to cautions for low level crime; with a conditional caution as an alternative to prosecution; as a pre-sentence offer once an offender has pleaded guilty, to inform sentencing; to form whole or part of a sentence imposed, or offered independently of the sentence. The CJA says that the voluntary process, used only where victims choose it, has high victim satisfaction rates. It cites Ministry of Justice research that says 85% of victims were very or quite satisfied with the experience and almost 80% would recommend it to others. In addition it helped victims feel a sense of closure and helped alleviate post-traumatic stress symptoms for victims of serious crime. MoJ research also suggests that the process reduced reoffending by around 14% and saves £9 for every £1 spent. The CJA report contains two case studies. The first was of a woman called Kathleen whose husband of 28 years was killed when a driver doing a U-turn on a dual carriageway collided with his bike. After her meeting with the driver who was convicted of dangerous driving, Kathleen said: ‘It was the first time I’d slept since my husband had died. It was very empowering. I was able to find closure.’ The second was Michelle, whose house had been broken into during the night. After meeting one of the lads involved, she said: ‘When I got out of the meeting, the knot had gone from my stomach, and I just felt so much better.’ The process appeared not only to have helped Michelle, but the offender too. Michelle asked to be kept informed of his progress. Scott, the offender, told the restorative justice officer: ‘I can’t do burglaries now, because I keep hearing your words in my head and it stops me doing it.’ It appears then to be a no-brainer – there should be greater use of quality restorative justice. But cynics will always point to examples that undermine the approach, such as the incident reported last week in the Daily Telegraph. It was about a thief who had stolen the replacement laptop of the victim after he was ‘forced to apologise’ under a restorative justice programme after stealing their original laptop. Reading the article it appeared that the arrangement was not a formal restorative justice programme – the offender had gone round by himself and without prior arrangement or consent from the victim after he said the police had asked him to visit to apologise. It would, I think, be unfair to judge restorative justice on the basis of that incident, but rather on the case put by the CJA. Follow Catherine on Twitterlast_img read more

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Systra doing well

first_imgGROUPE Systra recorded a net income of k7m on turnover of k205?4m in 2006, up 20% on the previous calendar year. The engineering consultancy subsidiary of SNCF and RATP now employs around 1 300 people, and recorded ’favourable’ results at Systra SA, MVA in Britain and Asia, Systra Consulting in the USA and Sotec Ingenierie in France.Turnover at Canadian businesses Canarail was up 70% on 2005 thanks to Saudi Arabia’s north-south line project and demand from the African ore extraction industries. Systra SA’s turnover grew to k113?8m, driven by developments in the Middle East include the Dubai Metro as well as work in Iran, Bahrain and Algeria. The group’s European activity was stable, with growth in eastern Europe, and contracts have been awarded for large-scale projects in Korea, Indian and Pakistan.nlast_img read more

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Deliver meals to Farmington area homebound seniors

first_imgThe Farmington Hills Special Services Department’s Adults 50 & Better Division is looking for volunteers to help make a difference in the lives of local seniors.Program volunteers are needed for the Meals on Wheels program, which delivers meals to homebound older adults. Volunteers make meal deliveries between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., Monday through Friday on routes that are all within the Farmington Hills/Farmington area. Substitutes are also needed to fill in for those who cannot commit to a permanent day or schedule.If you are interested in volunteering with the Meals on Wheels home delivered meal program, or if you are an older adult or know an older adult in need of meals, call Nutrition Services Coordinator Teresa Bryant at 248-473-1825.– Press release Reported by admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Reports – Premier League playmaker emerges as shock transfer target for Juventus

first_img Oscar in action for Chelsea 1 Chelsea playmaker Oscar has emerged as a shock transfer target for Juventus, according to reports in Italy.The Serie A champions are wary of the growing interest in their own attacking midfielder Paul Pogba, who is being courted by Real Madrid.The Spanish club are reportedly readying a world record transfer bid in the summer for the Frenchman and as preparation Juventus are looking at their own targets.And, according to Tuttosport, Oscar is the man Juventus have identified to fill the boots of Pogba.The Brazilian has been a key part of Chelsea’s side this season, scoring seven goals in 30 appearances in all competitions.The 23-year-old joined Chelsea in 2012 for £20m and manager Jose Mourinho is said to have no interest in parting with the attacking midfielder.last_img read more

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