IRP called out on coal-fired power water costs

first_img Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector TAGSCentre for Environmental RightsEarthlife AfricaEskomIRPKusile power plantLife After CoalWater Impacts and Externalities of Coal Power Previous articleKenya Power assures of business continuity amid arrests of senior managementNext articleGhana energy sector receives a $20m boost Nicolette Pombo-van ZylAs the Editor of ESI Africa, my passion is on sustainability and placing African countries on the international stage. I take a keen interest in the trends shaping the power & water utility market along with the projects and local innovations making headline news. Watch my short weekly video on our YouTube channel ESIAfricaTV and speak with me on what has your attention. Finance and Policy RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR BRICS Generation G20 countries: Stimulus packages support legacy energy systems. The Life After Coal campaign calls for the impact on water resources to be accounted for in the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) – South Africa’s plan for the future electricity system.Mining coal and burning it in power stations use large amounts of water, and pollutes even more water. It imposes massive but uncounted costs on society and particularly on poor people who live in the coal regions, states the Centre for Environmental Rights.The Life After Coal campaign partners, Centre for Environmental Rights, groundWork and Earthlife Africa, together with Greenpeace Africa, have indicated that they will have no option but to challenge an IRP that fails to adequately take the costs of coal into account, in court.The report, entitled Water Impacts and Externalities of Coal Power, was compiled by the Life After Coal campaign from a wide range of existing research on the cost of the impacts of coal mining and burning on water resources.Life After Coal spokesperson Saul Roux says: “The Draft IRP (2016) provides cost estimates for different energy technologies but does not include externalities of critical importance for electricity planning. This means that the costs of coal-fired power generation are significantly under-counted. South Africa is a dry country and cannot afford this.”IRP overlooks water impactThe detailed report outlines specific water impacts and externalities and draws attention to:Coal power requires enormous volumes of water. Coal mining and power generation together consume 5% of South Africa’s water resources.At local level in the Upper Olifants catchment, power generation accounts for 37% of water use.The external water costs of Eskom’s new Kusile power station are between R0.95 and R1.86 per kWh, according to a Greenpeace study. The opportunity cost (or scarcity value) of the water used for Kusile will be between R6 billion and R12 billion each year and the damage cost imposed on other water users from sulphate pollution will be between R4.5 million and R7.7 million annually.The electricity sector pays far less for water (approximately R3.40/m3) than the average household (approximately R8/m3). This means there is no incentive to prioritise water-efficient supply options. In contrast, properly valuing water would justify a rapid transition to water-efficient renewable energy.Our scarce water resources are impacted throughout the coal life-cycle. This includes direct impacts on water quality during coal mining; impacts of air pollutants on water resources and coal ash contamination of groundwater. Acid-mine drainage has the most severe impact, with treatment estimated to cost of around 0.38/kWh (ZAR 2009).Apart from future water treatment costs, the historical impacts of coal mining will require treatment and associated costs for decades to come. South Africa has close to 6,000 recorded derelict and ownerless mines. It is estimated that the closure of these mines, including long-term treatment of acid-mine drainage, would cost up to R60 billion.Including water supply and infrastructure costs into energy modelling could result in a 75% reduction in water intensity of the power sector by 2050.Renewable energy technologies use far less water. A decarbonised energy future would require four times less water, by 2050, than the draft IRP’s “Base Case” which relies heavily on coal and nuclear. A decarbonised future would also cost less and create up to 331,000 jobs in the energy sector by 2050 according to research by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research.The negative externalities of coal power disproportionately affect marginalised communities living near coal mines and power stations. This is contrary to both section 27 of our Constitution, which provides that everyone has the basic human right of access to sufficient and safe water and section 24, which provides that everyone has the right to an environment that is not harmful to their health or well-being.Misrepresentation of generation costsLife After Coal, together with Greenpeace Africa, has previously called for a set of basic minimum principles to be met by the IRP. One of these is that the IRP must take full account of externalised costs.Makoma Lekalakala, director of Earthlife Africa, says: “Excluding these costs results in the misrepresentation of the costs of coal-fired power generation. These costs do not go away. They are borne by the environment, by society in general and especially by poor communities.“Conversely, including these costs would justify a rapid shift from coal to water-efficient renewable energy. This transition is essential and urgent given South Africa’s water crisis. It is equally urgent that this is planned as a just transition that contributes creating a more equal society in which everyone has a place including workers who are currently employed in the coal sector.”The report makes clear that it is critical that the new draft of the IRP, which Energy Minister Jeff Radebe says will be published shortly, considers the full range of water-related externalities and impacts in determining and costing South Africa’s future electricity supply mix.  If not, the Life After Coal campaign, together with Greenpeace Africa, have indicated that they will have no option but to challenge such a failure in court.The Life After Coal Campaign continues to call for a least cost IRP that meets the minimum requirements and is in the best interest of all South Africans.Download the full report here. Water-Impacts-and-Externalities-Report_LAC UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon developmentlast_img read more

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Atalanta vs PSG FREE: Live stream, TV channel, kick-off time and team news for Champions League match

first_img Real or Fake? Shark Attacks Helicopter People Slammed By Massive Waves 4 UNDERDOGS Atalanta have reached the Champions League quarter-finals despite losing their opening three matches.Next they take on Paris Saint-Germain in Portugal as the final eight of Europe’s elite competition gets underway in a reduced single-match format.Atalanta lost their first three opening group games and still made it to the Champions League last eightCredit: Associated PressPSG go into the match after winning the French league cupWhat time does Atalanta vs PSG kick off?Atalanta vs PSG kicks off at 8pm BST on Wednesday August 12.Estadio Da Luz plays host for the match as PSG and Atalanta travel to Portugal to play at a neutral venue.What TV channel is Atalanta vs PSG on and can I live stream it?The game will be airing on BT Sport 1 and BT Sport UltimateCoverage begins from 7pm BSTHow can I watch it for free?EE customers can get a FREE three-month BT Sport app trial by texting SPORT to 150.Customers can then cancel at any time.Team newsAtalanta’s top scorer Josip Ilicic has returned to his native Slovenia to deal with a personal issue and will play no part of the Champions League campaign.PSG could have Kylian Mbappe fit and ready to play after he returned to light training and travelled with the squad to Portugal. Midfielder Marco Verratti is expected to be miss the game following a calf injury while Angel Di Maria is suspended.Edison Cavani left PSG in June due to the expiration of his contract and Laywin Kurzawa isn’t expected to be match fit.Latest oddsAtalanta to win – 5/2Draw – 27/10PSG to be victorious – 19/20Zapata to have 3 or more shots and to score in the second half – 10/3*Odds from Ladbrokes correct at time of publication. 8 MOST DANGEROUS RAINS of All Time | TOP 10 INTERESTING Top 5 Best Budget Hotels In Dubai under AED 400 a night. Rebekah Vardy scores an impressive penalty in six-inch heelscenter_img What’s This “Trick” Called? Comment Down Below!! Source: Soccer – thesun.co.uk Travel Diary // Vietnam 2017 10 INCREDIBLE Space Launch Failures!last_img read more

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