Sheriff’s office, Union City, North Bergen police to operate DWI checkpoints

first_img FBW says Prime Cycle’s new location violates state guidelines for Hoboken waterfront Sheriff’s office, Union City, North Bergen police to operate DWI checkpoints Facebook Twitter With the Thanksgiving holiday around the corner, several local law enforcement agencies have announced that they will be hosting driving while intoxicated checkpoints in the coming days. By John Heinis/Hudson County View“The Holidays are a time for families and friends to come together and celebrate. We just want you to do it safely. Thanksgiving Eve is one of the busiest bar nights of the year,” Hudson County Sheriff Frank Schillari said in a statement.“If you go out to enjoy the holiday, do not drink and drive. My Officers will be out looking for drunk drivers and you will be arrested if you are over the limit.”The sheriff added that 29 people are killed daily in alcohol-related crashes, which is why people should take mass transit, a cab service or use a designated driver if they plan on drinking.Furthermore, the extra sheriff’s office patrols will be funded with money from the Drunk Driving Enforcement Fund.Hudson County residents and commuters should also be aware that, in a joint effort, the North Bergen and Union City Police Departments will operate a DWI checkpoint on Wednesday.“The North Bergen Police Department & Union City Police Department are dedicated to making our roads and neighborhoods safer. By implementing sobriety checkpoints, we are doing our part to make sure everyone has a safe holiday season,” they said in a joint statement.They added that drivers who aren’t impaired will only face two to three minute delays while passing through the checkpoint. The exact location of the checkpoint will not be released beforehand, authorities said. TAGSdwi checkpointhudson county sheriff’s officenorth bergen policeunion city police SHARE RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR North Bergen/GuttenbergPolitics & PolicyUnion City Jersey City high school teacher suspended after rant calling George Floyd ‘a f***ing criminal’ By John Heinis – November 19, 2018 1:40 pm 0 Community Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Community Bayonne Previous articleAs controversy continues, judge nullifies Jersey City Council vote to move Katyn monumentNext articleCity of Bayonne to offer free lot parking for non-commercial vehicles in December John Heinis Bayonne has administered over 40,000 COVID-19 vaccinations since January, official sayslast_img read more

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Linde chilling solutions help bakeries on the rise

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First black female astronaut in space offers advice to young girls

first_imgLachlan Cunningham/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Dr. Mae Jemison, the first black woman in outer space, fell in love with science at an early age. Decades later, she’s encouraging girls of all ages and backgrounds to engage in STEM education and is shedding insight on how to overcome obstacles.Her path to making history wasn’t an easy one, but her love of science helped fuel her success.As a young girl in Chicago, she knew two things for sure: that she wanted to be an astronaut and that there were no black female astronauts.“I grew up in the 1960s, and the United States didn’t have women astronauts,” Jemison told ABC News. “There were no women of color in the astronaut program.”She remembers looking up at the stars in wonder, which pushed her unwavering interest in science.She also said she remembers feeling privileged to have teachers and family members who believed in her dreams.As the youngest child, her days were filled by spending time in libraries studying science and astronomy.“I was lucky enough to have teachers who taught me about Daniel Hale Williams and that Elijah McCoy built the cotton gin — a black person — I remember reading in books about the woman who did the original work on DNA, crystallography,” she said.She would carry her childhood dream of being an astronaut with her as she pursued higher education, earning a bachelor’s from Stanford University in 1977 and a doctorate in medicine from Cornell University in 1981.After serving as a Peace Corps medical officer in Sierra Leone and Liberia, she made the decision to apply for the opportunity she’d always dreamed of: a spot in the astronaut program.Not much had changed in regards to the program’s diversity. There were still no black woman.In 1987, Jemison was one of 15 selected for the prestigious NASA program. And the first black woman chosen, five years later, became the first to reach outer space.Jemison encountered resistance and obstacles along the way but said she always remained true to her dreams and remained confident“Even though folks might doubt me, I didn’t doubt myself,” she explained.Her advice to younger girls today? Don’t be fazed by those who try to limit your dreams.“People can put obstacles in front of you, and you have a choice,” she said. “You can sit there and try to make them change or you can go around it.”After leaving the astronaut corps in 1993, she used her dynamic background and experience as an engineer, physician and astronaut to help educate, inspire and reach back into the community. Jemison is now collaborating with Bayer Crop Science on “Science Matters,” a campaign aimed at encouraging kids of different ages and backgrounds to learn about agricultural science.There have been significant challenges in bringing STEM education to underserved communities and communities of color, Jemison said.“The obstacles to achievements are usually not the kids — it’s the parents, it’s the adults, it’s the society around them,” she added.Jemison said she believes it’s important for others to know minorities have always been woven into the fabric of the science community, even if their accomplishments aren’t widely noted, adding that exposure, expectation and experience are key to changing the narrative.“We have been in science all along, even when people didn’t want us involved,” she said. “I want folks to understand that they have the right to be involved. They don’t have to ask.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more

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