Finger Pointing

first_imgORLANDO, Fla. – Adam Scott as world No. 1? Hopefully those posters never went to the printer. His supposed coronation at Bay Hill only led to more final-round consternation. Up by a touchdown at the halfway point, Scott went into prevent defense and punted away several chances on the back nine Sunday at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. With two weeks until the year’s first major, he’s now in need of both a short-game cleanup and confidence boost. What the heck happened? Wire-to-wire winners are rare because, eventually, over 72 holes, a player shows a few weaknesses. He plays a few loose shots. He whiffs a few short putts. He begins to fade. He tires. The hope, of course, is that the damage during this inevitable downturn isn’t too severe, or that the lead is insurmountable. The latter was the case at last fall’s Tour Championship. Henrik Stenson led by nine at one point, only to watch as his weekend lead nearly evaporated. A few bogeys – and a few surges from the pursuers – can create a drowning sensation. “When you have a big lead and it comes back to you, you feel like you have lost something but you really haven’t,” Stenson recalled Sunday. “It had just felt like a done deal. It’s never easy, even though everyone expects you to win.” Arnold Palmer Invitational: Articles, videos and photos Well, of course we expected Scott to win. Here he was – at one of Tiger’s playgrounds, with Tiger’s old swing and caddie – on the verge of becoming world No. 1 while the proud champion he was dethroning stayed home with an achy back. And besides, closing out a seven-shot lead with 36 to play is what the second-ranked player in the world is supposed to do. Instead, Scott threw up a 71-76 to blow his best chance not only to win this season but also to ascend to world No. 1 for the first time. And make no mistake: There’s a lot of fresh scar tissue now on that chiseled frame. There was the 2012 British Open, where he bogeyed the last four holes to lose by one. And the 2013 Open, where he held the lead on the back nine Sunday but bogeyed three holes in a row to leave without the claret jug – again. And the 2013 Australian Open, where he squandered a four-shot lead – and the Scottie Slam – on the final day. And now this – a five-bogey 76 that left him two shots behind Matt Every’s 13-under 275. “I’m annoyed that I didn’t do better today,” Scott said afterward. “Sometimes you’ve got to be hard on yourself. Sometimes you don’t. I think I was getting into a really good spot and had an opportunity here to run away with an event and really take a lot of confidence. I’m taking confidence, anyway, just from some good play. But some opportunities you’ve got to take.” For all the talk of his soon-to-be-banned broomstick, there’s little disputing that the putter remains Scott’s greatest weakness, his biggest obstacle to being a prolific major winner. Though he’s 18th in strokes gained-putting in limited action this season, history tells us that is unlikely to last. He hasn’t finished inside the top 100 in that statistic since 2007. Scott needed only 23 putts during a first-round, course record-tying 62, but he wasn’t the same player on the greens the rest of the way. He took 30-plus swipes during both weekend rounds – including 32 on the final day, with only five one-putts – but still had opportunities to either win outright or force a playoff coming down the stretch. On the par-5 16th, he lined up a 20-foot eagle putt, but sent his first putt 4 feet by and misread the comebacker. On the very next hole, he tugged a 7-footer for par. “After missing a couple over the last couple of days, doubt creeps into your reads,” he said. “You need to be certain, and I wasn’t 100 percent on.” Now, his chances at Augusta likely depend on regaining that trust. “If nothing else,” he said, “this was a good reminder on how much putting practice I need to do for the Masters and just how important it is.” On more than one occasion recently Scott, a 10-time winner at age 33, has mentioned that he must capitalize on these upcoming years – the peak years – if he’s to vault into truly elite company. On Saturday night, after his seven-shot advantage was trimmed to three, he explained it thusly: “If I only win one tournament in the peak time in my career, it’s no different than the rest of my career so far. I’ve got to create these chances more often and I’ve got to take them more often than I have. I’ve got to start closing at a better rate than ever before.” Well, he created the chances Sunday – to play a solid round, to win emphatically, to reach a lifelong dream and become world No. 1 – only to kick them away. Some coronation.last_img read more

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Whitefish City Leaders Vow to Address Affordable Housing Issues

first_img Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. While Whitefish is abuzz with construction, local officials are worried the people who work at those new developments will not be able to afford to live in the community.The issue of affordable workforce housing was the subject of a summit hosted by Montana West Economic Development and the Whitefish Chamber of Commerce on Sept. 24. About 40 business and city leaders attended the morning meeting at Grouse Mountain Lodge.Mayor John Muhlfeld opened with a story about how he moved to the valley in 1995 and worked minimum wage jobs just to ski in the winter. But doing that today is tougher, he said, as rental rates continue to rise in Whitefish at a faster rate than anywhere else in the valley.“We’re slowly seeing the affordability gap widening here,” Muhlfeld said.Robert Horne, Jr. of Applied Communications, LLC, a local community-planning firm, illustrated that widening gap in a presentation following Muhlfeld’s remarks. In it, Horne noted that the average home price in Whitefish is nearly twice that of a home in Flathead County as a whole. According to the data, in 2015 the average price of a home in Flathead County cost $235,500, whereas the average price of a home in Whitefish cost $410,795. The data also shows a significant spike in home prices in Kalispell and Columbia Falls between 2014 and 2015.Whitefish also has some of the highest housing costs for renters. According to U.S. Census data, the average renter pays $812 a month in Whitefish, whereas the average renter in Kalispell pays $731. As a result of the higher prices, some of the people who work in Whitefish cannot afford to live there.Horne also talked about his experience as a community planner in Jackson Hole, Wyo., which has faced similar issues in recent years. To address the lack of affordable housing, Jackson Hole has instituted linkage rules that require certain area businesses, especially ones in the service industry, to find ways to house their employees. Jackson Hole has also implemented inclusionary requirements that require home developers to set aside some housing for low-income renters or buyers.According to City Manager Chuck Stearns, Whitefish has voluntary inclusionary zones where developers can earn certain density bonuses. Stearns said to make the inclusion zones mandatory in Whitefish, a complete housing needs assessment would be required. However, many people in attendance felt it was an option that should be explored.At the conclusion of the meeting, Whitefish Chamber Executive Director Kevin Gartland said the city should work with the business community to create a position or committee to do further research the town’s housing issues.“When we walk out of this room we need to have someone carry the torch on this issue,” he said.last_img read more

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UECC orders third LNG PCTC

first_imgUpon delivery in 2022, the vessel will be used on UECC’s Atlantic shortsea trade.“This order is another step in our commitment to cleaner shipping,” said Glenn Edvardsen, ceo of UECC. “Our experience with LNG duel-fuel vessels has been good, and we want to keep moving forward to expand our sustainable fleet.”UECC added that the battery-hybrid solution will exceed IMO’s target of a 40 percent reduction of carbon emissions by 2030. The ships will also meet the IMO Tier 3 NOx emissions limitations.uecc.comlast_img

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Gabon coup attempt poses little threat to global oil market

first_imgA still image taken from a video posted on January 7, 2019, shows military officers giving a statement from a radio station in Libreville, Gabon. HANDOUT via Reuters TV Any potential disruption to Gabon’s oil output, following a military coup attempt, would only have an impact on a small share of OPEC’s total output because the country produces so little.A still image taken from a video posted on January 7, 2019, shows military officers giving a statement from a radio station in Libreville, Gabon. HANDOUT via Reuters TVMilitary officers seized Gabon’s state broadcaster Monday in what appeared to be a coup against ailing President Ali Bongo. The soldiers who attempted the coup have been arrested and there has been no reported disruption to the country’s oil output, which accounts for just 0.5 percent of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ total production.Last month Gabon pumped 170,000 barrels a day, according to a Bloomberg survey of officials, analysts and ship-tracking data. Equatorial Guinea was the only member of the cartel which produced less crude.The west African republic produced around 22,000 barrels a day of petroleum products in 2017, according to OPEC data, and its oil exports were worth around $3.7 billion. This is just a fraction of the $578.3 billion total value of OPEC’s oil exports in 2017, according to the group’s data.Gabon became a full member of OPEC in 1975 but terminated its participation in 1995. It then re-joined on July 1, 2016. The country launched its 12th licensing round in November, offering 12 shallow-water and 23 deepwater blocks and was due to begin a roadshow promoting the round, starting in Houston on Jan. 5.Considering OPEC and its allies have agreed on a coordinated effort to reduce production and rebalance the market, following a 20 percent slump in Brent prices last year, any loss of Gabon’s crude is unlikely to significantly tighten the market or send prices higher. Last month, Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest oil exporter, cut its crude shipments to the lowest since Bloomberg began tracking them.Related Oil producers meet in Nigeria to discuss effects of global oil glut Gabon’s opposition party denies link to coup attemptcenter_img African Union chief condemns coup attempt in Gabonlast_img read more

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