Staying on track in virtual classes: Tips for remote learning

first_imgIf you have any of your own ideas about remote learning, tell us about them! Published: March 23, 2020 • By Clara Geoghegan, Aria Jia With the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak, schools and universities across the country have unexpectedly embarked on the largest online learning experiment ever.  This is probably not how any of us envisioned our semester going, and the transition has maybe been easy for some, but we’re guessing it’s been rocky for most of us. With that in mind, here are some tips for making the transition to remote classes go a little more smoothly and making sure that you are still getting the most of your education. 1.  Make a schedule and stick to it.Now that we are trying to reduce the spread of COVID-19, our daily routines are looking a bit different. Instead of waking up, eating breakfast, drinking coffee (or whatever wakes you up in the morning), walking/biking/busing/driving to campus and then going to class, our routines are limited to inside the house. It might be tempting to set your alarm for 10 minutes before your first class, roll out of bed, and hop on your computer at the start of class, still half asleep. Don’t do this. So, make a schedule and stick to it. We recommend using Google Calendars since any Zoom meetings on your professor’s schedule can be added to your calendar with one click. You can then incorporate your daily routine around any classes you have, and all the Zoom links you need throughout the day will be in one place. Schedule a time to wake up, walk the dog, make breakfast, do a non-gym workout, or whatever you normally do before class. Also, schedule yourself 10-15 minutes before class (think of it as your digital “passing period”) to get prepared for your Zoom meeting. Which brings us to our next tip…2.  Environment matters; be prepared. Pay attention to how you work and concentrate best. This is different for all of us, but please don’t use your bed as your desk, if you can avoid it. Not only can going to class in bed mess with your sleep schedule, but for most of us, it is probably not where you concentrate the best. Try to make a space in your room or apartment just for classes and school work. Tailor it to what personally works best for your concentration, but also make sure it is a workstation that is ready to go. Have all your class materials, like textbooks and notebooks, on hand. If you are using a laptop, keep it charging while you are in a class session and always use headphones to avoid audio feedback. Keep water and snacks on hand, and make sure you are comfortable enough to sit for an hour or more. 3.  Make the best of a bad environment.Not everyone has an ideal place to work and go to class in their home. With Boulder’s high rents, a lot of us share rooms or live in places without room for a desk. Not every student has access to a laptop or computer either. For those in less-than-ideal circumstances, remote learning might be hitting you the hardest. If you don’t have a computer and primarily use your smartphone or library computers, now might be the time to get a device for your home. Unfortunately, due to the campus closure, the CU Book Store cannot rent laptops to students. But with all classes going remote, investing in a cheap or refurbished laptop for the coming few months might be worth it.If you share a room or live somewhere that is not ideal for online classes, here are some tips for making your environment as conducive to learning as possible. Share your class schedule with your roommate. It’s easy to do in Google Calendar, and this way you both know when the room needs to be quiet. If you aren’t already doing this, use headphones. It might seem like common sense, but do what you can to be respectful of one another’s education and needs. If you don’t have a desk or a space that can be converted to a school station, convert your bed into a workstation by day. Place something sturdy or hard on your bed (like a cutting board or a large book) to turn it into a makeshift desk. Place a pillow, stool or chair on the ground to work. This might seem like a funky setup, but it will help you mentally shift gears from being at home to being ready for class. 4.  Zoom-iquette, or best practices for ZoomLike anything, there are good ways and bad ways to act when using Zoom. With online classes, using best practices for remote learning is important for your experience and that of your classmates. If your instructor hasn’t done so already, mute your microphone whenever you are not talking. You can hold down the spacebar on your laptop to unmute yourself if you are asking a question. Try to find a place where no one is walking behind you. This will minimize distraction for you and your classmates. Use a pair of earbuds or a headset so you don’t disturb anyone around you. This will also help your classmates hear you better. And, WEAR CLOTHES! Maybe that seems obvious, but you wouldn’t show up to class in just your underwear, and chances are your classmates don’t want to see that over Zoom either. 5.  Participate. Get used to interacting with your professor and class digitally. It might be weird at first, but asking questions and volunteering answers will help you feel more engaged with the class and will help you from getting lost in the lesson. Use the “raise your hand” function in Zoom to let your instructor know you have a question. Click on the “participant” tab of your Zoom controls, at the bottom of your screen. Next to your name will be a hand icon; click it. This tells your instructor you have a question or something to add without interrupting the class. Or, if you find yourself getting lost in the lesson, use the “chat” option. You can send a message or ask a question to the whole class or any individual member of the class. Think of this as the digital equivalent of turning to your neighbor to ask them if they understood something or wrote down the last line on a slide. 6.  Use office hours. Professors and instructors tell us this every single week, but now especially, USE OFFICE HOURS! This is a new teaching format for most of us as students, so if you feel yourself falling behind or in need of clarification, don’t be afraid to reach out to your instructor. They probably want to know what parts of the class aren’t translating as well digitally, and talking to you beats sitting at their desk in an empty Zoom session. Bonus points if you add their office hours to your well organized and gorgeous Google Calendar.  Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on UnsplashCategories:blogTags:Student resourcesremote instruction2020last_img read more

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dryrobe in partnership with RLSS UK

first_img Related Swim robe specialist dryrobe is partnering with The Royal Life Saving Society UK (RLSS UK), to support the organisation’s work to help prevent drowning in the UK and beyond. dryrobe adds that it is looking forward to collaborating with RLSS UK and continuing to promote its vital messages of water safety and drowning prevention.The partnership will see dryrobe products in use across RLSS UK operations – with lifeguards and safety teams utilising the unique warming benefits of the dryrobe, to treat casualties at a wide range of events throughout the year.dryrobe will also be a supporter of key initiatives co-ordinated by RLSS UK. One such programme is SH2OUT – which aims to promote water safety by providing accreditation to open water swimming venues, events and clubs.New for 2019 is Pool to Pond – an initiative designed to support pool swimmers looking to make the transition to open water swimming and ensuring this is done in the safest possible way.The Royal Life Saving Society UK is a drowning prevention charity and the UK’s leading provider of water safety and drowning prevention education. Using an extensive knowledge of water safety and training, RLSS UK has developed a comprehensive range of vocational qualifications as well as a series of non-vocational awards and programmes. These have the ultimate aim of preventing drowning and stopping unnecessary loss of life to the water – including the National Pool Lifeguard Qualification (NPLQ), the professional industry-standard lifeguard training programme.Helen Bowker, Commercial Manager for RLSS UK welcomed the partnership. She said “As we seek to promote open water swimming and water-based activities, as important contributors to mental and physical health and well-being, it is vitally important participants are able to stay safe while they enjoy themselves.“Getting warm and dry quickly afterward, is an integral part of the open water experience and as such, we’re delighted that a company like dryrobe, with its innovative approach and great designs, have come aboard.”Gideon Bright, dryrobe Founder and Director added, “We’re very proud to be in partnership with RLSS UK. dryrobe is all about being active and enjoying time outdoors, as well as staying safe while you do so. We’re committed to promoting RLSS UK’s mission of water safety, so this partnership really is a perfect fit.”www.rlss.org.ukwww.dryrobe.comlast_img read more

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Arrow Video FrightFest Glasgow 2020: A Ghost Waits review

first_imgHandyman Jack (MacLeod Andrews) is hired to clean a house and get to the bottom of why its owner is struggling to keep tenants. Jack enters the house when the latest family cuts short their lease and he camps out there while he carries out his work. With his own issues filling his head, Jack is surprised to learn that a ghost – or spectral agent as she prefers to be known – called Muriel (Natalie Walker) is haunting the house to drive people away. As Muriel steps up her attempts to get rid of Jack, he unexpectedly starts to fall for her. A Ghost Waits is the feature film debut of writer and director Adam Stovall. As with any first films, particularly those from independent film-makers, this effort has its fair share of issues but it has a considerable amount going for it too. The premise is a sound one with Jack making an instant impact on the audience as a likeable lead that you want to root for. Following the initial set-up where you see a family driven from the home, the film switches gears as it gives Jack time to acquaint himself with the house. There are spooky occurrences going on around him, which he largely doesn’t notice, and they are enough to hook in the viewer. Credit: Rebecca Films Credit: Rebecca Films It’s made clear from the outset that Jack is a bit of a loner who feels that he does plenty for other people without ever getting anything in return. This is shown through a series of phone calls that leave him increasingly frustrated as he asks for favours and is frequently turned down. All the while Muriel is creeping around the house and she doesn’t reveal herself to Jack for around 40-minutes, which I thought was a little too long a wait. It made the second half of the story, where Jack falls for Muriel and a sub-plot around Muriel’s inability to get Jack out of the house felt a bit rushed, making it hard for me to buy into what was unfolding. For a feature debut, Stovall gets a lot right. His casting of Andrews is a winner, the premise of his story is sound and the screenplay, for the most part, is solid. With a bit of tweaking to the pacing and a better matching of the on-screen talent in terms of chemistry and ability, A Ghost Waits would have been elevated. Most importantly though, Stovall shows promise and I’m certainly keen to see what he comes up with next. In MacLeod Andrews, Stovall has a very strong leading man. He impressed me in last year’s The Siren, and he gets the chance to show off his comedic skills here. Andrews is very charismatic and he pulls the audience on side very quickly. Unfortunately, he’s not matched by Natalie Walker as Muriel. She can’t bring the same depth to her performance that Andrews manages, and that results in a lack of chemistry between the two. Still Andrews has a much bigger role in the film than Walker so there’s still enough there to hold your interest when the cracks start to show. The single biggest issue with A Ghost Waits is that it tries to do too much. The introduction of the spectral agency, while an interesting idea, doesn’t have the opportunity to breathe in the short run-time of the film. It also distracts from Jack and Muriel, which is the plot you want to see more of and that you buy into once the two become known to each other. I’m also not entirely sure why the film was shot in black-and-white. I didn’t mind that it was, it’s just that with the story set in the modern day, I was a little confused as to the reasoning behind it. Cast: MacLeod Andrews, Natalie Walker, Sydney Vollmer, Amanda Miller Director: Adam Stovall Writer: Adam Stovall Certificate: TBC Duration: 79 mins Released by: Rebecca Filmslast_img read more

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Badminton camp a success

first_imgBy Royston Crandon Guyana’s national badminton player Narayan Ramdhani has hailed his one-week badminton camp a success.Ramdhani, who is currently home on holidays from University, and is preparing for the upcoming Pan Am games in Peru spoke to Stabroek Sports in an exclusive interview.“Yea, it was surely a success. We had a lot of kids turning out… and we had the opportunity to teach them the basics. “The camp cost six thousand dollars and we gave them a Yonex Racquet which was basically the camp fee. We did it to encourage more participation in badminton,” he said adding that the development of the sport was at the forefront of the decision to stage the camp.“We really want to continue developing badminton in Guyana. You know we have been doing well over the years and my sister and I will be out of the juniors soon so we need to spot new talent and develop the ones we have,” was his take.  The camp was held daily at the National Gymnasium from 10:00hrs to noon and at the Marian Academy during the latter part of the day. The camp was supported by Ansa McAl.last_img read more

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