Ebola’s other unsung heroes: the planners who keep the response running

first_img Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. @HelenBranswell Outbreak logisticians are the people who supply the response teams, who find them beds to fall into at the end of exhausting days, and food to sustain them and vehicles to transport them. It’s their job to create the conditions in which the people who know how to stop Ebola can get that essential task done.advertisement It isn’t crazy to conduct an Ebola clinical trial in a war zone — it’s necessary HealthEbola’s other unsung heroes: the planners who keep the response running About the Author Reprints When we think of Ebola outbreak responses, chances are what comes to mind are courageous doctors and nurses caring for people afflicted by one of the cruelest and most deadly diseases known to man. What we tend to overlook is the mountain of work needed to ensure there is a treatment unit in which to care for the sick, and that there are boots and gloves and aprons and face shields to protect the medical staff. ‘Young miracle’: Baby recovers from Ebola in Congo outbreak Please enter a valid email address. As Ebola outbreak spreads in Congo, concern grows over supplies of experimental vaccine Related: Leave this field empty if you’re human: Case in point: The 27 staff bedrooms at the Katwa camp are already full, so more beds were being brought in, and people will have to double up.ALIMA, which is operating a 61-bed Ebola treatment center in Beni, where the outbreak response is headquartered, goes through about 100 sets of personal protective equipment — PPE in infection control parlance — daily, ordered from Europe or North America, André Jincq, the organization’s emergency response logistics coordinator, said in an email. Ensuring that the critical supplies are always available requires careful advanced planning. Without this protective gear, treatment centers could not safely function.Comer said MSF tracks the global stocks of coveralls to ensure the supplier is able to produce what aid workers need. The group has already stockpiled PPE supplies in Goma, a large city south the outbreak zone. There haven’t yet been cases in Goma, but there is concern the virus will make its way there, and the logisticians don’t want to be caught flatfooted.“Your teams are telling you: XY is probably going to happen. We should increase A, B, C, and D to anticipate. We then go ahead and do that,” Molinaro explained. “And then when A, B, C, and D is needed, it seems like magic to the users that these things are just there. But these things arrived there after a process of discussion, really assessing the risk and then taking a call on whether we should forward something or not.”This is Molinaro’s first Ebola outbreak. He joined WHO in mid-July and quickly “got thrown into it,” he said. (The outbreak was declared Aug. 1.) Prior to joining the WHO, he worked for the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund — UNICEF — in the Middle East. So he’s done this type of work before. But little else has the urgency of an Ebola outbreak, he said.“Here we’re dealing with a situation if we’re not able to get a vaccination team in, equipped, and around the case and the contacts within a very short period of time — measured in hours — there’s potentially the chance … the virus moves on, infects, and kills people,” he said. Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine.center_img Privacy Policy Related: Related: An MSF Ebola treatment center in Mangina, in the DRC. Nyka Alexander/WHO Paul Molinaro is not looking forward to Christmas. He’s no Scrooge. But when you’re trying to keep an Ebola outbreak response up and running, the season of celebration and good cheer is a major inconvenience.Rather than anticipating family gatherings, festive feasts, and brightly wrapped gifts, Molinaro, chief of operation support logistics for the World Health Organization’s emergencies program, dreads the likelihood of shops being closed, customs operations being understaffed, and pretty much everything he and his staff need to get done being that much more taxing over the Yuletide.“Suppliers will tend to start shutting down for the holiday season. It becomes harder to get the windows of delivery because you may anticipate Kinshasa airport being a lot slower. It just becomes a pain for me,” said Molinaro, who is overseeing a team of several dozen logistical workers on the ground in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and at WHO headquarters in Geneva.advertisement By Helen Branswell Dec. 20, 2018 Reprints Molinaro said the response teams are using a smartphone app developed by the International Organization for Migration that allows them to keep tabs on staff in the field. “It has a panic button. It has an ‘I’m OK’ button. ”Because of the security concerns, there are actually two types of personnel protective equipment needed by outbreak staff. Molinaro calls them PPE-H (for health) and PPE-S (for security). The latter refers to Kevlar vests and helmets — not exactly standard attire in an Ebola outbreak.One service that had been on Molinaro’s to-do list turned out to be too difficult to execute, even for a crew of people who get the impossible done. He’s not 100 percent sure how people working for the WHO are getting clean clothes.“It’s something that we were trying to put into place. But it’s actually a lot of work. Because you have to identify whose laundry it is. You have to make sure when it’s done it’s all going back to that owner,” he said. “That in itself would be a logistics operation of remarkable precision…. Laundry really goes into micro-planning of ‘I don’t have two socks.’”He’s curious about how the laundry dilemma has sorted itself out, but he suspects staff have found a local fix. “I think it ended up just kind of evolving through capitalism,” he said. Helen Branswell These days, most of the spread of Ebola is occurring in the cities of northeastern Congo, which is both a curse and a blessing. A curse because urban outbreaks are harder to extinguish. A blessing because it’s easier to meet some of the logistical needs than it would be in rural, difficult-to-access areas, suggested Yves Willemot, head of communications for UNICEF’s DRC country office.Staff can be housed and fed in the hotels and restaurants of Beni, Butembo, and Goma, said Willemot — though he did acknowledge there is fierce competition for hotel beds.“If you have 300 people from WHO and 50 from UNICEF, there’s a constant rotation of people coming in and people going out and rooms becoming available and new rooms being requested, etc. It’s a constant ‘fight’ to get rooms,” he said, supplying the air quotes. “And so the circumstances in which people are working and living are not necessarily always very easy.”All those people need to get around. That means hiring vehicles, which can require some creativity, noted Molinaro, who said the WHO has a fleet of about 350 vehicles at its disposal now.“Right at the beginning … it’s seeing a car come by and then asking, ‘Would you like to hire this [out]?’ And then word getting out and vehicle owners starting to present themselves and then you start going into a bit more of a process,” he said. “Inspecting the vehicle. Testing the driver. Coming up with a standard contract.”The outbreak response has also been able to draw on the resources of a United Nations peacekeeping force, MONUSCO, which has been operating in the region for nearly two decades. About 40 of the vehicles at WHO’s disposal are MONUSCO vehicles on loan. They come equipped with radio communications — a “stroke of luck,” said Molinaro, given that it’s safer if a convoy of cars includes one with a radio.The safety of outbreak response workers is an enormous concern in the region, where rebel forces have been known to kidnap and kill. On Monday, a World Food Program worker was killed in an ambush north of Goma. When the right equipment is in the right place and in the right amounts, it “seems like magic,” Molinaro said. But in reality, it’s a lot of hard work.Molinaro’s crew is supporting the upward of 300 people working for the WHO in northeastern Congo to extinguish this latest Ebola outbreak, which is now the second largest in history. As of Wednesday there have been 549 cases and 326 deaths since the outbreak began, likely in late April.In addition to the WHO, there are several dozen international agencies and non-governmental organizations assisting the Congolese government in the battle to end this outbreak. They all need accommodations, meals, medical equipment, power generators, structures in which to care for the sick, vehicles in which to move from town to town, satellite phones or cellphone SIM cards, and more — much more.The effort involved in sourcing all these necessities of work and life so that the Ebola responders can work on issues of life and death are divvied up among different partners in the response, Molinaro told STAT.“Some of the partners, they have their own setup. It’s better like that; they know what they want in terms of their setup, the way they do their clinical management or care,” he said, noting this is especially true for the main medical NGOs that operate the Ebola treatment centers, ALIMA and Doctors Without Borders, which is known by the acronym for the French version of the name, MSF. “It’s definitely a team effort.”Kim Comer, emergency logistics coordinator for MSF, was in DRC this week overseeing construction of a new treatment center in Katwa, a neighborhood in the large city of Butembo. Transmission of Ebola is picking up there, and a new treatment center is needed. The work involves everything from bulldozing the field to erecting fencing and hospital structures of wood and plastic sheeting, putting in latrines, installing generators to provide electricity, and myriad other things.“If I could just work 20 more hours today, I could get my to-do list done,” said Comer, who is on her third Ebola outbreak. “But there’s just no way to get the list done.” Tags infectious diseaseslast_img read more

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Smartphone market suffers worst ever quarter

first_img India smartphone shipments grow Devices Manny Pham Manny joined Mobile World Live in September 2019 as a reporter based in London. He has previous experience in telecoms having worked for B2B publication Mobile News for three years where he climbed up to the position of Features Editor…. Read more HomeDevicesNews Smartphone market suffers worst ever quarter Previous ArticleMobile Mix: Coping with Covid-19 congestionNext ArticleCovid-19 spurs iPad app growth China smartphone shipments recovering from Covid Relatedcenter_img Author Figures from analyst companies showed the smartphone sector suffered its largest-ever decline in shipments during the opening quarter, due to the Covid-19 (coronavirus) pandemic.Figures released separately by IDC and Strategy Analytics showed an average of 275.4 million units were shipped during the quarter, compared with the 321.4 million units average of their Q1 2019 numbers.In a statement, Strategy Analytics director Linda Sui said Q1 was the “worst performance since records began”, with consumer demand drying up due to lockdowns.IDC research director Nabila Popal separately highlighted “a supply-side problem” in China. The country, which accounted for a quarter of global shipments, was at the peak of its lockdown during Q1, resulting in a “huge impact on the overall market”.Compounding this was the fact other major global economies implemented containment measures just as China was easing restrictions, Popal noted.VendorsThe research companies’ top-five tables broadly concurred, with Samsung heading the charts with an average of 58.3 million units followed by Huawei (48.8 million), Apple (37.9 million) and Xiaomi (28.5 million).However, they were split on which vendor took fifth spot: IDC reported Vivo returned to the top five, while Strategy Analytics said fellow Chinese vendor Oppo held the spot.Sui noted Xiaomi benefitted from a domination of the “huge India market”, meaning its shipments remained flat on Q1 2019, while the other vendors recorded declines.IDC broadly agreed, but noted Apple suffered the lowest rate of decline, thanks mostly to momentum around its iPhone 11 series.It predicted Apple’s recently unveiled iPhone SE could boost shipments moving forward. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Q1shipmentssmartphones Tags European operators target phone sustainability AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 01 MAY 2020 last_img read more

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Helen Kay Moore

first_imgHelen Kay Moore, 80 of Port Arthur, Texas passed away Wednesday, October 7, 2020 at the Medical Center of Southeast Texas in PortArthur.Helen was born October 19, 1939 in St. Amant, Louisiana to Felix Arceneaux and Elva Lagvine Arceneaux.She was a resident of Port Arthur for over 40 years and a member of Faith Harbor Assembly of God Church. Helen was preceded in death by her husband Bill  Moore; father, Felix Arceneaux; daughter, Felicia Wells; sisters, Peggy Arceneaux and BettyLambert.Survivors include her mother, Elva Arceneaux of St. Amant, LA; son, Kelly Sport of Arkansas; son-in-law, Bill Wells of Nederland; sister, Shirley Ellis of Port Arthur; brother, Butch Arceneaux and wife Barbara of St. Amant, LA; grandchildren, Amanda Skinner, Robin Brown, Brittany Brown, and David Brown; and eleven great-grandchildren and one on the way.Helen lived an adventurous life. She was an expressive storyteller and had a story for everything. She loved to travel and sightsee. One of her favorite pastimes was going to bluegrass festivals.She never met a stranger. She always enjoyed the company and antics of her grandchildren and found peace with her church family.center_img A visitation for family and friends will begin at 12 noon on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves followed by the funeral service at 2:00 p.m. with Pastor Lynn Parker officiating.Burial will be at Oak Bluff Memorial Park in Port Neches.last_img read more

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Australia Joins ReCAAP

first_imgOn 3 August 2013, Australia became the nineteenth Contracting Party to the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia (ReCAAP).The ReCAAP ISC welcomes Austalia’s joining to the ReCAAP. Australia supports fully the ReCAAP aims of enhancing multilateral cooperation among its members.Australia’s accession to ReCAAP signifies the growing strength of the ReCAAP network and demonstrates the importance of international cooperation to effectively address the challenges in combating piracy and armed robbery against ships in Asia.Rear Admiral David Johnston, Commander Border Protection Command said: “Australia proudly welcomes the accession as the 19th member to the ReCAAP.”“Australia is committed to combating the crime of piracy and is equally committed to comprehensive engagement in the Asia Pacific region through cooperation, capacity building and active participation in regional organisations such as the ReCAAP.”“Participation in the ReCAAP will provide Australia with greater visibility and awareness to monitor emerging regional threats from piracy and armed robbery at sea,” Rear Admiral Johnston said.“The Australia Government looks forward to joining the ReCAAP discussion and drawing upon the vast experience and expertise of our regional partners on piracy.“Australia, together with the ReCAAP ISC, recognises the importance of strengthening regional capacity in order to advance the protection of trade, security and sea lanes and, ultimately, ensure the safety of seafarers on the high seas,” Rear Admiral Johnston said.Commander Border Protection Command reinforced that international cooperation is the most effective way to tackle piracy, as demonstrated by the successes in the fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia, and is confident that the ReCAAP Information Sharing Centre (ISC) will continue to demonstrate its effectiveness in improving security at sea in Asia.The Commander of Border Protection Command has been appointed as the ReCAAP Information Sharing Centre (ISC) Governor for Australia. Border Protection Command’s Australian Maritime Security Operations Centre has been designated to be the focal point of Australia.A ReCAAP ISC Team led by its Deputy Director, LTC (Retd) Nicholas Teo, visited the ReCAAP ISC Governor and the key officials of the Focal Point of Australia. In addition to operationalise the Information Network System (IFN), the team gained an insight on Australia civil maritime security arrangements in Australia.ReCAAP, August 6, 2013last_img read more

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Fencing Installed Along Alaska Railroad Tracks

first_imgAlaska Railroad spokesman Tim Sullivan says the point was driven home when 85-year-old Ronald Jackson was struck and killed last month near his home of Crown Point. We asked Sullivan how often an encounter on train tracks is fatal… Sullivan says he heard reports some sightseers stood on the tracks even as trains sounded their horns and flashed their lights. It can take up to a mile for a train to come to a complete stop. The Railroad is building 850 feet of fencing, saying “brazen” railway crossings this summer led to multiple emergency stops. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Railroad is installing six-foot-high cyclone fencing along mile 113 of the Seward Highway, to prevent sightseers from crossing the tracks. Sullivan: “Way too often for anybody’s wishes. About 500 people a year are killed a year around the country trespassing on railroad tracks. It’s not nearly as common up here, however it’s still a dangerous situation. We’ve seen 11 people killed trespassing on Alaska Railroad tracks since 1985 and a number of others who’ve been injured as well. We just encourage people to stay off the railroad tracks. They’re not a safe place to play and they’re certainly not a place to be using as a path from one place to another.”last_img read more

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Chelsea loanee Izzy Brown opens up on his injury hell, Jose Mourinho’s hype and Frank Lampard’s evolution

first_img 10 INCREDIBLE Space Launch Failures! Top 5 Best Budget Hotels In Dubai under AED 400 a night. REAL vs FAKE GOLD What’s This “Trick” Called? Comment Down Below!! Source: Soccer – thesun.co.uk LOUNGING IN a hotel room in Holland, teenage talents Izzy Brown and Dominic Solanke are mulling over some high praise from Jose Mourinho.It’s 2014 and, while on Chelsea’s pre-season tour, the Portuguese coach has just admitted he should take full responsibility if Brown, Solanke and Lewis Baker are not senior England internationals in the next few years.Izzy Brown signed for Chelsea in 2013 – and has been loaned out ever sinceCredit: PA:Press AssociationBrown has managed just one senior appearance for Chelsea – under Jose MourinhoCredit: Getty Images – GettyBrown smiles when reminded, and recollects: “Dominic was like: ‘Izzy, did you see what Jose said?’“We didn’t pay too much attention to it at the time. We were only 16 or 17 and thought England was a long way away.“We appreciated that one of the best managers in the world said that about us, but all we cared about was first team football.“That was enough of an accomplishment for us.”Five years on, and based on his own bold promise, Jose should be looking back with a guilty conscience at the progress of his young British trio.In that 2014/15 title winning campaign, Baker would make no first team appearances, and was loaned out to Sheffield Wednesday and then MK Dons in January.Solanke became the youngest Chelsea player to make his debut in the Champions League after coming off the bench against NK Maribor in October 2014 – his only senior appearance.And Brown finally made his Premier League debut in the penultimate game of the season – a 3-0 loss away to West Brom.What followed for these three would be loan move after loan move after loan move – fourteen in total between them – as well as reputations of being injury-prone, unsettled, not good enough or difficult to manage.It’s the latter that annoys Brown the most, who himself is still signed on to Chelsea after switching from West Brom as a 16-year-old, currently enjoying a sixth successive loan – this time with Luton Town.And it’s the fact he is still associated with the Blues that he believes he has earned an unwanted and undeserved tag.‘I’M NOT BIG TIME – I JUST LIKE CARS’He explains: “I feel like a lot of people have a perception of me that I am big time. I am not big time when you get to know me.“I am confident and I like cars. It is just a hobby but I don’t do it to show off.“People have their perception. When they really meet me then they know. It is probably because I am from Chelsea.“People think when you are from Chelsea you get everything, and it is true that when you are growing up at Chelsea you get everything given to you. It is not the real world.“When you step out in the real world is when you go out on loan. Then you really understand what football is like. I think at Chelsea they sugar coat it when you are young.“That’s why loans are so important because you can man up. When you come in the dressing room, there’s no one there for you.“They are grown men and they will tell you when you are not doing good enough.“It was nice to get away and I did it young, and it wasn’t too much for me because I wasn’t at Chelsea growing up. I was at West Brom and came through their academy.“I wasn’t really in the bubble after being at West Brom but then you see other players in that bubble and you think they don’t understand.“They don’t have to clean player’s boots, but it is just because it is a massive football club.”Brown has tried his hardest to escape the Chelsea bubble as frequently as possible over the last six years with spells at Vitesse, Rotherham, Huddersfield, Brighton, Leeds and now Luton.Injuries and inconsistent form has seen him make over 20 appearances in less than half of these season-long loan moves.His most recent set-back, an ACL injury while at Brighton that dragged on into his switch to Leeds, left him wondering whether he would ever be the same man again, let alone a football player.Brown suffered a huge set-back with an ACL injury at BrightonCredit: ReutersA sad admission from the man who still dreams of emulating his hero Dennis Bergkamp when he catches a glimpse of the Arsenal striker on Sky Sports’ Premier League Legends.But right now, Brown’s confidence is high, just as when Mourinho attempted to fill his ego with dreams of a Three Lions debut. He explained: “In my head, I think I can play in the Premier League.“I don’t think that’s big headed because I have been there before and I don’t think I was out of my limits. But with my injuries I took two steps back when I was on my way up.“When I am on the pitch, I do feel like you can’t tackle me. I am going to run over you in this game. You are not going to get close to me. If it is me against you then I am going to beat you.“When you go into a game with that mentality, you are already a step. You’re not arrogant. You are confident.”He added: “I am not focused on the Premier League at the moment.“I think everyone has a different path. You can have your moment when you are 18 or 25. There’s no age limit.“I know that when my time comes, I am going to be ready to take it.”For all his talk of having eyes only for Luton, it would be naïve to believe that Brown’s gaze has not been drawn to the progress of Frank Lampard’s new-look Chelsea, where the kids are finally being given a chance.Brown has struggled to cement a place in the Chelsea first teamCredit: Rex FeaturesBrown reveals former Blues star turned coach Tore Andre Flo has already been to see him at Luton’s training base three times this season, as well as at three Championship games.And for most, this constant reminder of big strides being made in your absence could lead to a build-up of anger and resentment.Instead, Brown insists he feels nothing but pride for his childhood pals Tammy Abraham and Fikayo Tomori.He said: “We are all 1997 kids. We played at England together.“It’s great to see as everyone used to think Chelsea don’t bring through young players.“But now Lampard is in charge you are starting to see them playing well and Chelsea are winning games so you can’t question that those players are not good enough because they are going out every day and performing.“I am happy because for the future of Chelsea and the young players there, it’s going to be a good thing that they are doing so well.”This maturity and level-headed nature stems from Brown’s upbringing, as well as the new responsibility of fatherhood with girlfriend Destiny and their baby daughter.He reveals his mother’s post-match analysis mirrors that of his own coaches, while Destiny’s doting nature – even while pregnant – provided him with the support he needed when recovering from injury.And if Brown is to finally recapture his dream of becoming a Premier League regular at Chelsea, the biggest thanks will land at their doors.‘MY GIRLFRIEND WOULD HELP WASH ME’Brown laughed: “I don’t really watch my assists or things like that. I look at the negative things. The misplaced passes and losing possession.“My mum will even tell me: ‘Your pass completion was only 70%? That’s not good enough!’“I was in a situation the other day where I made the team of the month and I had the second highest rating. My mum asked: ‘Why weren’t you the highest rating?’ I was like: ‘I have just got back to playing every week!’“It is good because it keeps you grounded and it makes you want to do more. When you start getting ahead of yourself and taking it for granted then that’s when someone can take your place.”He continued: “I don’t know how my girlfriend put up with me after my ACL operation.“The mood swings from the heavy tablets I was having – I was a ghost. I didn’t know what I was saying but she made sure I had my ice on every minute. She would refill it.“She would get me drinks when I couldn’t move, help me upstairs and even washed me when I couldn’t shower.“She made sure we did the exercises together that the doctor gave me. She was pregnant and doing the exercises while I was injured. She did a lot.“I don’t know where I would be. I could still be injured or have the pain in my knee.“She did so much. She was watching over me.”Chelsea player fines revealed as Frank Lampard demands £20,000 for being late to training and £500 a minute for meetings center_img Rebekah Vardy scores an impressive penalty in six-inch heels Travel Diary // Vietnam 2017 People Slammed By Massive Waves 4 8 MOST DANGEROUS RAINS of All Time | TOP 10 INTERESTINGlast_img read more

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