Fresh new deal for Set Up Events, with GOSoap as series…

first_imgSet Up Events, a leading US producer of triathlons, running and endurance events, has partnered with GoSoap as the Official Sports Detergent of Set Up Events.The GOSoap sponsorship, which runs through 2013, includes category exclusive rights as the Official Sports Detergent for each Set Up series including the AAA Car Care North & South Carolina Triathlon Series, TrySports Series, Virginia Triathlon Series, Maryland Triathlon Series, Georgia Triathlon Series, Brave Soldier Challenge and Trek Relays.“GOSoap is excited to partner with Set Up Events and share our products with their loyal community of athletes,” said Steve Teeples, President & CEO of GoSoap. “As a family of competitors, we know how expensive technical clothing is. We’ve created GOSoap Sports Detergent to protect the athletes’ investment and restore their clothing.”Teeples added, “We feel this partnership with Set Up Events will help raise awareness of our product and we are looking forward to growing with them.”“We are proud to partner with GOSoap and are confident in the product and how it works,” said Andrew Silbereisen, President of Set Up Events. “GOSoap provides athletes with a carefully engineered product, and it’s great to have a company that is so focused on the athlete aligned with Set Up Events.”www.SetUpEvents.com Relatedlast_img read more

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CVL Consultants announce new president, Ryan Weed

first_imgDesign and engineering firm CVL Consultants, announces new President Ryan Weed, PE, to succeed retiring leader Les Olson. Effective today, Weed is named president of Arizona while Olson will serve as president emeritus until his complete retirement, which is expected in May.Weed, previously executive vice president, has been with CVL since 1997 and worked closely with Olson. He holds a degree in civil engineering from Northern Arizona University and is a licensed professional engineer (PE). His engineering experience includes planning and zoning, preliminary layout, final construction documents, and coordination for residential, commercial, solar, energy, parks and master-planned communities. His leadership expertise includes navigating government relationships, regulatory matters, and helping comprehensive teams think creatively to solve problems in ways that benefit communities and clients. He will continue to be actively involved in project management and client relations.CVL’s history in the Southwest spans nearly six decades of design and engineering in the areas of transportation and rail, fuel transmission, solar arrays, utilities, single-family and multi-family residential, commercial shopping, industrial centers, churches, universities and more. Integrated design services include civil engineering, land surveying, land planning, landscape architecture, water resources, storm water engineering, construction services and permitting. Notable past projects in Arizona include Trilogy West, Arizona Mills, Arizona Public Service substations, Aloravita, Layton Lakes, Arizona State University, Tegavah, and Kierland Commons shopping and residential.“Ryan will lead us forward because, like Les, he embraces the value of innovation through technology and the importance of doing right for the client, which has been CVL’s calling card from the beginning,” says Michael Geddes, chairman of the board at privately held CVL. “Les successfully led us through widespread economic challenges and Ryan worked alongside him through that. I know this will be a seamless transition for clients and employees, and Ryan will keep a heavy emphasis on exemplary client service.”Olson, who served 26 years with CVL and became president in 2000, is credited with helping the firm weather two national recessions by diversifying into the renewable energy sector – particularly solar and energy transmission. He also developed new business opportunities with Native Americans and with education, churches, healthcare and resorts. He led CVL’s expansion into North Dakota as energy development demanded new engineering and housing infrastructure.Olson and Weed also led CVL through an organization-wide culture assessment to emphasize innovation and quality, and to re-emphasize client service. CVL now begins each project with a cross-departmental team to identify opportunities for design innovation, sustainability and livability for the end user, and responsible use of all resources involved.“We’re excited to hear of Ryan’s new role; he’s a very knowledgeable person and always focused on the client’s need,” says David Garcia, vice president of land acquisition at Shea Homes. “He and CVL are very customer-driven and service-minded. They’re experienced enough to know what we need, they bring tremendous value and finish the job efficiently.”last_img read more

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What if Age Is Nothing but a Mind-Set?

first_imgThe New York Times:One day in the fall of 1981, eight men in their 70s stepped out of a van in front of a converted monastery in New Hampshire. They shuffled forward, a few of them arthritically stooped, a couple with canes. Then they passed through the door and entered a time warp. Perry Como crooned on a vintage radio. Ed Sullivan welcomed guests on a black-and-white TV. Everything inside — including the books on the shelves and the magazines lying around — were designed to conjure 1959. This was to be the men’s home for five days as they participated in a radical experiment, cooked up by a young psychologist named Ellen Langer.The subjects were in good health, but aging had left its mark. “This was before 75 was the new 55,” says Langer, who is 67 and the longest-serving professor of psychology at Harvard. Before arriving, the men were assessed on such measures as dexterity, grip strength, flexibility, hearing and vision, memory and cognition — probably the closest things the gerontologists of the time could come to the testable biomarkers of age. Langer predicted the numbers would be quite different after five days, when the subjects emerged from what was to be a fairly intense psychological intervention.Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Study shows that junk-food is conducive to a habitual mode of behavior in rats

first_imgPeople are easily pulled into binge culture’s quick-fix obsession with junk-food. But, according to a study published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, they might just as easily be able to pull themselves out of it.Laura Corbit, assistant professor at the University of Sydney, and her team wondered how one might counteract unhealthy eating habits. They were curious to find out how food cues, such as billboards and commercials, affect our decisions about where, what and how much to eat. How does our environment shape how we eat?In order to figure out useful strategies against obesity and metabolic disease, they used lab rats to conduct a series of experiments replete with oreos, pringles, jelly snakes and chow. Email Share on Twitter Pinterest Share on Facebookcenter_img LinkedIn Share They showed that environments where tasty high-fat and high-sugar treats were routinely consumed induced habitual control: animals lost the ability to make volitional nutritional choices based on the current value of food. But the study also showed that rats could easily be brought out of this state.For people, habitual behavior means that eating patterns are not necessarily dictated by conscientious weight regulation and health concerns, but also by external food cues that shape and perpetuate certain eating habits: a world where McDonalds billboards loom large at every corner, luring you in with the promise of cheap, high-fat and high-sugar food.A first experiment backed this idea up by looking at volitional versus habitual control in rats. Animals were initially given repeated exposures to junk-food or bland chow environments. After being food-deprived, they were trained to press levers that provided either sugar water or pellets. Then, once they were full, they were once again placed in junk-food and bland chow environments in order to see whether these distinct contexts would affect their food-seeking behavior.This first experiment showed that a junk-food environment caused rats to exhibit a more habitual mode of behavior than a bland chow environment.But could aspects of the environment also reverse this habitual behavior?In a second experiment, the rats underwent the same procedures as in the first experiment. This time, however, distinct sound cues were played whenever rats were placed in junk-food or bland chow contexts, creating specific environmental cues associated with specific food types.The researchers found that the cue played in the bland chow context improved sensitivity to the devaluation of food, when rats were subsequently placed in the junk food context after having been fed.A sound cue paired with bland food is all it took to take rats out of a habitual mode of behavior and back into a volitional mind frame.The idea that we control how, when, and what we eat assumes — wrongly — that we are always able-minded enough to make measured, healthy decisions. Our best intentions could be assailed by a constant stream of sensory information.If the frequently habitual nature seen in rats is translated to people, this study offers encouraging insight. The researchers suggest using simple interventions, such as reminders of how unhealthy certain foods are or interrupting the automatic processing of junk-food cues. A number of smartphone apps have already been developed to stymie the consumption of unhealthy food. Equally, simply putting up signs that point out healthy food options in a food court can be an effective way of bringing us into a volitional state of mind.As a corrective to obesity and metabolic disease, humans can come up with their own preventive cues, which may jolt them out of habit and into health.last_img read more

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