Comment / The 2016 Loadstar ‘Watchlist’ : which high-flyers are at the crossroads?

first_img“Saudi Arabia-Iran rift could further disrupt oil prices,” MarketWatch wrote on Monday. Equity markets are plummeting today, but prices in the future markets indicate that oil trades could be more resilient than many had thought they would be in early January. This matters a lot in the transport industry at a time when fears about a China slowdown have returned with a vengeance.If oil prices surge earlier than expected – as BP chief executive Bob Dudley hinted a few days ago – it could be tough times ahead for the core passenger businesses of Air France-KLM and Lufthansa, both of which have been bailed out by low fuel prices over the last 18 months. Both carriers bought time in 2015, with the black gold trading below $60 a barrel for most part of the year, but in spite of that Air-France-KLM shareholders recorded a significant paper loss (over 10%), while Lufthansa investors managed to get away with only a small paper gain, and it’s hard to image they actually enjoyed the ride. Now they are left with more questions than answers, in my opinion.Strikes still weigh on their bottom lines, and have become more recurring than in the past – this is a problem that will likely persist for some time. In this context, Air France-KLM will have to model the economic impact of strikes as soon as next week if recent reports are to be trusted.Even though economic profits surged on a reported basis in their trailing quarters – Lufthansa raised guidance for Ebit, while Air France-KLM sounded more upbeat on cash flows – there remains a high degree of uncertainty surrounding their business models and financials.Take Lufthansa. There’s talk that it is looking for a new boss, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that turned out to be true, given its recent troubles and its poor ability in managing expectations. We correctly predicted a dividend cut in early 2015, and now the market seems to believe that the German carrier many need new leadership at a time when operational risk is apparent.Airbus recently said it had to postpone the delivery of its new A320neo jet to Lufthansa until the beginning of 2016, which may not be a big deal, but “the management team of Lufthansa should have been tougher in the negotiations with Airbus to secure a better deal,” a German source close to the deal told me.CargoWhile more optimism seems to surround Lufthansa Cargo these days, its finances remain under the spotlight, and rightly so. It is cutting costs, but nobody knows if that is enough in the current market. “Annual operating expenses, mainly staff costs, are to be reduced by at least EUR 40m by 2018,” Lufthansa said in its latest quarterly results, which showed anaemic growth figures in the cargo unit.Well, if you think that Lufthansa Cargo is facing a difficult time that is because you are not familiar with the situation at its French rival. In fact, Air France Cargo’s Ebitda losses widened to €200m from €120m in the first nine months of 2015, and more than offset the combined profit gains in the maintenance and Transavia units.Air France Cargo is looking for alternatives, but investment requires fresh funds, which come at a premium these days. As Lufthansa recently pointed out in its third-quarter results, the cargo operations of its French rival are expanding at a time when, in my view, they should shrink.“Air France-KLM and China Southern Airlines have entered into a freight partnership, which will provide Air France-KLM’s cargo division, Martinair Cargo, with access to the main Australian cities via the freight hub in Guangzhou.”“It can also use capacities in freighters on routes between Guangzhou and Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City,” the German group said.The restructuring of its “full-freighter activity is fully on track”, Air France-KLM argued in its third-quarter results, where it also acknowledged that demand is weak in a pricing environment “dictated by non-hedged players”.Revenue per available ton kilometer (RATK) fell 11.5% on a like-for-like basis.UTi, Hapag & PanalpinaElsewhere, US 3PL UTi is likely to be one of the most exposed freight forwarders in the marketplace if a takeover by Denmark’s DSV doesn’t close successfully in the first quarter.But where do we stand now with regard to the deal?Well, there has been radio silence since late October, when some shareholders demanded a higher premium than that being offered by DSV, which valued UTi at $7.1 a share, for a total market value of $1.3bn, excluding net debt. As I argued in my previous coverage, DSV is paying a fair price to acquire UTi given its deteriorating financials and the fact that the latter is running out of options. In fairness, it doesn’t look like UTi management team is up for the fight, so I would expect DSV to carry the deal over the finishing line by the end of March.DSV stock hasn’t performed particularly well in recent weeks, and currently trades around the level it recorded soon after it announced its acquisition of UTi. I would be surprised if the deal fell apart, but I am not preoccupied about DSV- it is a mean, lean machine and is truly encouraging that even during uncertain times it received the backing of key shareholders, with BlackRock announcing that it had raised its stake to almost 5.4% at the end of last year.Talking of companies that have something to prove to their ailing shareholders, how not to mention Hapag-Lloyd, the world’s fourth-largest box line, which managed to get away with a heavily discounted IPO in 2015. We warned retail investors about the risk of investing in the offering last year.Frankly, I do not know what lies ahead for Hapag, although its de-leveraging plan seems to be on track. Yet I know that the market leader Maersk needs options, and has the financial wherewithal to surprise investors, while the $2.4bn takeover of Singapore container shipping line owner Neptune Orient Lines by France’s CMA CGM will certainly force Hapag to deliver on its promises, and it could put additional pressure on margins.Finally, Panalpina. As we expected, its shares have not managed to rally for weeks now, and it’s hard to predict better times ahead, really, given that air and ocean freight markets will almost certainly continue to be very challenging over the next twelve months at least. What is not difficult to predict, however, is that soft end markets could force it to take drastic action on is cost base, essentially cutting staff – and that would be an easy thing to do if a break-up occurs. The 2016 Loadstar Watchlist comprises: By Alessandro Pasetti 04/01/2016center_img Air France-KLMLufthansaPanalpinaUTi WorldwideHapag-LloydWith hindsight, 2015 turned out to be a transitional year for most of the companies that we have added to our watch list in 2016.These are: Air France-KLM, Lufthansa, Panalpina, UTi Worldwide and Hapag-Lloyd. The Loadstar team will closely follow their developments, as we believe they have approached a very critical stage in their corporate strategies at this critical economic juncture.Air France-KLM and Lufthansa, in particular, could be at the crossroads.More questions than answerslast_img read more

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People / Michelle Ho appointed new president of UPS China

first_img“In that role, she was instrumental in driving UPS’s transition to a wholly-owned operation. I am certain that Michelle’s extensive experience and leadership will serve UPS well as she leads more than 6,000 employees to deliver the best-in-class logistics experience for customers inside and outside of China,” he added.Previously, Ms Ho was president for the South Asia district of UPS Asia Pacific, where she focused on driving strategic growth for UPS’s express operations across a diverse range of 28 emerging and mature markets in south-east Asia and the Pacific Islands.Before that, she was vice president of Intra-Asia Strategy, where she led several service enhancements and network utilisation improvements that contributed to the improved financial performance of the UPS Asia Pacific network.Meanwhile, as a committee member of UPS’s Women Leadership Development programme, she participates in a range of public outreach programs to drive empowerment for women and support professional development.“In the course of my journey with UPS, I have witnessed the evolution of the Chinese economy, which has evolved from a low-cost production model to one that is driven by value-added manufacturing, high-tech production, and a growing consumer-base,” she said.“As China continues to reform and open up, significant opportunities – and challenges – will present themselves. I am excited to be able to lead UPS’s efforts in this key market, in providing Chinese businesses – big and small – with comprehensive logistics solutions that will enable them to trade more efficiently around the world,” she added.Earlier this year, UPS renewed its 10-year cooperation agreement for operations at the UPS International Hub in Shanghai Pudong International Airport until 2028. With sorting capacity of up to 17,000 pieces hourly, the hub sees 44 weekly flights that connect to more than 200 countries and territories in Europe, the Americas and Asia.UPS also increased its Shenzhen Asia Pacific Air Hub’s processing capacity by nearly 50% in preparation for volume gains in the coming three years. By Gavin van Marle 04/11/2019 UPS has appointed Michelle Ho (pictured above) as the new president of UPS China, succeeding Harld Peters.Ms Ho is a UPS veteran with 26 years of logistics experience and will spearhead UPS’s small package and strategic business planning operations in China.“UPS has had an established presence in China for more than three decades now, and our broad portfolio of services and global network puts us in a prime position to help Chinese businesses with their cross-border connectivity needs,” said Ross McCullough, president of UPS Asia Pacific.“Michelle is no stranger to the China market, having previously served as financial controller for UPS China.last_img read more

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Deputies: Two teens caught in car stolen out of Collier County

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementBoth teens are facing charges for grand theft of a motor vehicle, resisting an officer without violence and loitering and prowling. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement LEE COUNTY, Fla. – Two teens were busted driving a stolen car on Wednesday night, according to the Lee County Sheriff’s Office. A witness saw Christopher Colmenares and Amberly Simuta run into the Publix at Grande Oaks after pulling on car door handles in the parking lot. When Lee County deputies arrived on scene, the pair took off in a Dodge Journey. The teens crashed the car into a ditch and tried to run away, but deputies caught them. Later, law enforcement discovered the car was stolen out of Collier County. Advertisement Man killed during shooting at Central Avenue June 12, 2021center_img AdvertisementTags: Fort Myers Thief scoops up tip jar at Fort Myers ice cream shop June 16, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments WATCH: Fort Myers lotto looter on the run with stacks of scratchers June 16, 2021 FMPD surrounds home after shooting June 12, 2021last_img read more

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ASC to explore reforms to embedded commissions

first_imgOSC announces key details for embedded commissions roundtable Facebook LinkedIn Twitter IIROC fines Worldsource $100,000 Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Trailer ban comes with industry rebuke The ASC will host a session in Calgary on Oct. 23, and in Edmonton on Oct. 24, to consider issues raised in a consultation paper published back in January, which proposes banning embedded commissions and requiring firms to charge investors directly instead. “These sessions are being held as part of our ongoing consultation process on this matter,” the ASC says its announcement. Next week, the British Columbia Securities Commission will also host an open meeting on the subject. It’s not yet clear what type of action regulators will take to address the investor protection concerns posed by embedded compensation models, which create conflicts of interest, limit investors’ bargaining power, and may distort the market for advice. Recently, the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) held a roundtable session in Toronto to examine possible alternatives to banning trailer fees, and other forms of embedded compensation. While the industry is pushing back against a ban, Maureen Jensen, OSC chairwoman and CEO, told the roundtable audience that “the status quo is not an option.” The OSC has indicated that it hopes to reach a policy decision by the spring of 2018. Read: Debate on trailer fees heats up Photo copyright: enki/123RF The Alberta Securities Commission (ASC) on Friday announced plans for a pair of meetings later in the month on proposed reforms to discontinue embedded commissions. Regulators celebrate World Investor Week and Investor Education Month Keywords Embedded commissionsCompanies Alberta Securities Commission James Langton last_img read more

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FP Canada’s President’s List honours top performers

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media “Light planning” could expand access to financial advice FP Canada, IQPF update projection assumption guidelines amid pandemic man opening curtain to reveal something Sergey Nivens/123RF FSRA updates title reg proposal Keywords Financial planning,  CFP,  AwardsCompanies FP Canada Facebook LinkedIn Twitter FP Canada announced the members of its President’s List for the June 2019 sitting of the CFP examination on Wednesday. The President’s List honours individuals from across Canada who received the highest marks on the national exam. Craig Hughes, from Winnipeg, Man., Vaughn Hoskins, from St. John’s, NL, and Andrew Porteous, from Richmond Hill, Ont., were named first, second and third place, respectively.  Related news The three candidates stood out among a total of 717 who wrote the final national CFP examination in June. They will be recognized at the Celebration of the Profession Dinner at the Sheraton Centre Toronto on Nov. 19, set to take place during Financial Planning Week 2019. To qualify to write the six-hour CFP exam, candidates must have first completed an FP Canada-Approved Core Curriculum education program, the FPSC Level 1 Examination in Financial Planning and an FP Canada-Approved Capstone Course. After three years of relevant work experience, successful CFP examination candidates are eligible to apply for a CFP certification. However, the requirements for obtaining CFP certification are changing on Jan. 1, 2020, when the FPSC Level 1 certification will be replaced by the qualified associate financial planner (QAFP) certification.  Maddie Johnson last_img read more

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Dispute Resolution Foundation Hosts Fundraiser Today

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Dispute Resolution Foundation of Jamaica (DRF) will be staging its second annual fundraising concert today (June 1) in an effort to improve its training facilities.Featuring the Jamaican Folk Singers, the concert will take place at the Wolmer’s Girls School Auditorium, 2 Marescaux Road in Kingston commencing at 5:00 p.m. Tickets cost $1,000 for adults and $500 for children and may be purchased at the DRF or at the school auditorium on Sunday.Speaking with JIS News, DRF Training Manager, Jennifer Williams explained that the Foundation is attempting to reach a $200,000 target that will greatly boost the training component of the DRF’s responsibilities as it strengthens the use of mediation and other effective methods of preventing and resolving disputes in communities.According to the Training Manager, “the proceeds of the concert will be used to tile the training room, purchase an overhead projector so that we can make our presentations more visible and also to put a computer in the training room with Internet access so that persons who are away from their offices will be able to stay in touch.”Since the start of the year, more than 100 persons have benefitted from the training facilities at the DRF with another 25 persons slated to begin in June. One mediation training takes place each month.In the meantime, Ms. Williams is encouraging everyone to support the concert, which she says is part of a bigger strategy to satisfy the demand for conflict resolution in Jamaica.“Based on what is happening in our society there is a greater demand for conflict resolution training and so we are working to improve the standard of the DRF and the training facilities. It’s a concert that is also bringing out our Jamaican culture, which of course everybody should be aware of, so everybody is invited to that concert and I promise you that it will be a good performance,” she emphasized.Some of the sponsors of the event include, Jamaica Biscuits, CARIMED, and Jamaica Beverages. Patrons will also get the opportunity to interact with the staff of the DRF and obtain brochures and other materials on dispute resolution techniques. RelatedDispute Resolution Foundation Hosts Fundraiser Today Advertisements RelatedDispute Resolution Foundation Hosts Fundraiser Todaycenter_img Dispute Resolution Foundation Hosts Fundraiser Today UncategorizedJune 3, 2008 RelatedDispute Resolution Foundation Hosts Fundraiser Todaylast_img read more

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Australian FM statement on Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

first_imgAustralian FM statement on Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Department of Foreign Affairs and TradeToday we mark 10 years since the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, as we join our Japanese friends to remember those who tragically lost their lives.The Australian Government pays its respects to the Government and people of Japan, the first responders, and those who lost loved ones in this disaster.In the decade since the disaster, Japan has shown great determination to recover as a nation and rebuild the disaster-affected regions.The people of these regions have shown great resilience and have generously shared their lessons on disaster recovery and preparedness with others around the world.Throughout this difficult time, Australia has been at Japan’s side as a friend and partner. In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, Australia deployed a 72-person Urban Search and Rescue Team, as well as Defence assets to work alongside Japanese authorities. Australian companies have also made lasting contributions to rebuilding the affected communities in the years since 2011.The partnerships formed during the response to this disaster led to friendships between Australian and Japanese people which endure to this day.When Australians faced our own challenges during the bushfires in 2019-2020, Japan extended a helping hand by deploying members of the Self Defence Force to help with the recovery effort.Through these challenges, the Special Strategic Partnership between Australia and Japan has been further strengthened. We are committed to contributing to the peace, stability and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific, including in responding to the challenges presented by COVID-19. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, bushfires, covid-19, Defence, defence force, DFAT, disaster, earthquake, FM, Foreign Affairs, Foreign policy, Government, Japan, Japanese, Minister for Foreign Affairs, rescue, resilience, tsunamilast_img read more

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WTO Trade Negotiations Committee UK Statement 4 May

first_imgWTO Trade Negotiations Committee UK Statement 4 May Director General, it is very good to be here. I congratulate you on your first TNC HoDs [Trade Negotiations Committee, Heads of Delegation] – it is mine too, and I look forward to meeting more of my colleagues in person in the days, and weeks, and months ahead.DG, before I came to Geneva I spent quite a bit of time talking to, and listening to, British businesses, big and small, from across sectors, about what the WTO means for them. I found that many of them were a bit gloomy about the fact that the WTO hadn’t done very much of late, for them. But equally, they were very keen to engage with the WTO, and hopeful that MC12 would actually show that the WTO was back in business, and backing business, and that we were rebuilding confidence in this institution. And while we work on the small print in these virtual rooms, business is of course innovating, and is in many ways getting ahead of us: if that means in services, in digital trade, or in data.I think one of the big challenges for us all as an organisation, is to try and catch up. Look at the extraordinary innovation that has happened in digital through this pandemic – not just in the developed world, but also in the developing. That is why we want to see an outcome not just on the domestic regulation JSI, but we also want to lock in significant progress on the e-commerce JSI by MC12, with a clear plan for completion after that. As others have said, we also have to tackle this digital divide by levelling up, not just domestically, but internationally too. It will come as no surprise DG, to say that we also support open, market-oriented trade, and our businesses want us to strengthen the rules in that space to ensure fair competition.Many of my colleagues this morning, and you yourself DG, have rightly highlighted the issues of health and the environment. I think it is inconceivable that MC12, in the middle of a pandemic and standing at the precipice of a climate disaster, should not tackle the environment and health in a really significant and substantive manner. We really welcome the work that you have undertaken, and I am interested to hear and to engage with the pharma industry, to scale up production and supply. As others have said, none of us is safe until we are all safe. We have signed up to the Trade and Health Initiative and we need an ambitious health outcome at MC12. It is no surprise, too, as host of COP26 in Glasgow, that we believe that we have a real responsibility to future generations: to make sure that trade works to address this climate emergency, that it works for the environment, and most importantly of all, that the WTO enables this extraordinary green revolution, and all the opportunities that it brings for so many countries across the world. That is why we support the exploratory work on environmental services in the CTS-SS, as well as discussions in the TESSD. We would like to see a ministerial declaration on the environment at MC12.Like you, we are behind the Blue Revolution as well as the green revolution, and we want to see the negotiations on fisheries subsidies brought to a conclusion as soon as possible – in the interests of our people, our fish, and our planet. We have to remember the stakes with which we are playing.You have asked us what we are going to do to help. We are going to do all we can within the G7: at the Foreign and Development Ministers meeting today, at the Trade Ministers meeting at the end of the month, and then at the summit in Cornwall in June, to support your efforts to revitalise the WTO and have a successful conclusion to MC12.You have said to us all that we need to change our working culture, we need to listen more, to read out a few less pre-prepared statements – this is not my pre-prepared statement I should add – and I think we need to do more than that. We need to do more than that, we need more listening, so that you can do more gavelling.Director General, all power to you, and I wish you the very best of luck with your efforts. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:British, director, Emergency, environment, future generation, G7, Geneva, Government, health, industry, innovation, production, regulation, the Summit, UK, UK Government, WTOlast_img read more

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A modern look at Chaco Canyon’s ancient past

first_imgTop: An aerial view of Pueblo Bonito, which spreads over nearly two acres; bottom: Lekson and his colleagues excavate Woodrow Ruin in New Mexico. (Credits: Robert Adams; Stephen Lekson) Top: Stephen Lekson excavating an archaeological site in southwestern New Mexico in 1972; bottom: A more recent image of Lekson at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Culture National Historic Park. (Credits: Stephen Lekson)  Some of Stephen Lekson’s fondest memories from his 45-plus years as an archaeologist are of mornings at Chimney Rock. This site in southern Colorado was a satellite community for a society called the Chaco Canyon culture, which thrived in the Four Corners region from about 850 to 1150 A.D. The town spreads over sandstone cliffs that climb nearly 1,000 feet above a valley. And at the top of what Lekson called a “knife edge ridge” is a great house, a massive living space that overlooks the smaller dwellings below. To get to that building, “you’d drive up out of the clouds, and the fog would burn off, and you’d see mountains all around,” said Lekson of the CU Boulder Museum of Natural History and Department of Anthropology. “It’s a beautiful setting.”But for Lekson, who recently retired, that beautiful setting also says something about the ancestral Pueblo peoples who lived there. He contends that the Chaco Canyon culture was a stratified civilization, ruled by elites or royals who resided in great houses and towered over castes of commoners—literally, in the case of Chimney Rock. It’s an argument that goes against what generations of archaeologists have believed about the Southwest: that the people who populated this region before contact with Europeans lived only in small, agrarian and egalitarian societies. It’s also the central theme of the scientist’s new book, A Study of Southwestern Archaeology.“In the Southwest, we’ve had this glass ceiling that got set over the field more than 100 years ago,” Lekson said. “And for some reason or another we just can’t get out from underneath it.”Chocolate and parrotsThat glass ceiling, Lekson explained, begins with academic baggage—in particular, the assumptions that white archaeologists made about the Southwest in the early 20th Century.Public intellectuals like Ruth Benedict and John Collier, reeling from the violence of World War I, created an image of the Southwest that was filled with “Zen gardeners,” Lekson said—peaceful people who lived in harmony with their environment. It had little to do with the lives of actual Pueblo peoples, modern or ancestral. “In that interwar period, there was a lot of change,” Lekson said. “I think that image of Pueblos appealed to Americans: They’re permanent, constant and peaceful.”In his new book, which was released in late 2018, he makes the case that such a stereotype doesn’t fit for huge chunks of the historic Southwest, including Chaco Canyon.That civilization, he said, may have encompassed as many as 100,000 people at its height, with a capital city in what is now Chaco Culture National Historic Park in New Mexico. And they probably weren’t all equal.Take a great house about 85 miles south of Chimney Rock called Pueblo Bonito: The rulers who lived in this building—which was four stories tall and contained an estimated 650 rooms—drank cacao and kept macaws imported from Mexico. They also buried select members of their dead in indoor crypts lavished with thousands of turquoise beads. That’s a big contrast with commoners who lived in much smaller homes and buried their own dead in communal cemeteries. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mailcenter_img Published: Jan. 22, 2019 • By Daniel Strain Banner image: Stephen Lekson (with tripod) and colleagues excavate the great house at Chimney Rock in southern Colorado. (Credit: CU Boulder) “If you picked up Chaco and dropped it anywhere else in the world, archaeologists wouldn’t have any problem with it,” Lekson said. “In the Southwest, we’ve turned it into a pilgrimage center, anything but a capital city, which is clearly what it was.”Scott Ortman, an assistant professor in anthropology at CU Boulder, has also studied the ancient Southwest. He agrees that Chaco Canyon looks like nothing else for hundreds of miles.“There are all these ways in which the legacy of early anthropology is still with the field,” he said. “I think Steve’s book is the clearest and best deconstruction of that.”Moving forwardIt is also Lekson’s last book as an archaeologist—probably. With that in mind, he doesn’t want to come off as a gadfly or a malcontent. Instead, he’s trying to answer a question that many young researchers have asked him: what now?Lekson’s biggest piece of advice is that members of his field need to start thinking less like cultural anthropologists and more like historians. In practice, that means taking a deeper look at archaeological evidence and paying attention when that data doesn’t fit the academic stereotype of a Pueblo. “We treat these societies as following a straight line to when some white guy shows up in 1920s and writes down an anthropological account,” Lekson said. “But a historian would say that in any society, there are ups and downs and dead ends.”In other words, Lekson hopes that Southwestern archaeologists will begin to see the region for what it is: complex, dynamic and human. “That’s all I’m trying to do in this book—to draw out some things that will help to move the field forward,” he said.Categories:Arts & HumanitiesNews Headlineslast_img read more

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Watch the Dead Rise on the Walking Dead Wine Labels

first_imgPinterest AdvertisementLiving Wine Labels App Brings Entertainment To The Wine AisleNapa, Calif. (Jan. 11, 2018) — An epidemic of apocalyptic proportions is sweeping the globe, as fans of Robert Kirkman’s best-selling comic series and one of cable TV’s most popular shows well know, causing the dead to rise, society to crumble, food to become scarce and all manner of hardships to be visited upon the populace.  Luckily, there is still wine. The Last Wine Company is introducing The Walking Dead Blood Red Blend and a Cabernet Sauvignon, each featuring a label that respond to the Living Wine Labels app, an augmented reality innovation that brings labels to life in compelling ways. “Watch The Dead Rise” by downloading the Living Wine Labels app from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.  The California wines, available nationally, retail for $18.99.The Blood Red Blend sports an image of Sheriff Rick Grimes staring down the undead. When the app is launched and pointed at the label, Sheriff Rick fights off the “walkers” in the wine aisle. The Walking Dead Cabernet Sauvignon label features a horde of zombies, and when the Living Wine Labels app is launched and pointed at the bottle, they break out of the label onto the phone screen. Pointing the app at both labels, when the bottles are side by side, triggers the characters to fight each other. Corks are collectible, featuring a variety of images such as barbed wire, a walker hand and an undead head.The Living Wine Labels app builds on the popularity of the 19 Crimes wine app, which first brought augmented reality to wine labels.  The criminal rogues on the label of each 19 Crimes wine come to life to tell their own story when the app, which has been downloaded more than 500,000 times, is pointed at the label.  The Living Wine Labels app will continue to work with the 19 Crimes wine labels, as well as labels from Chateau St. Jean, Beringer Brothers and Gentleman’s Collection, in addition to The Walking Dead wines.  All the labels will bring entertainment and engaging experiences to the wine aisle beginning in February, 2018.Fans of The Walking Dead comic series are loyal and highly involved, with more than 50 million comics in print and digitally, worldwide.  The series has millions of followers on social media, and The Walking Dead television show, which will return from a winter hiatus in February, is the #1 show for ages 18-49, with more than 36 million Facebook followers.“We know how enthusiastic fans of The Walking Dead can be and we expect they will embrace the Living Wine Labels app and The Walking Dead wines with real excitement,” said Seth Hynes, who is leading the introduction of the wines for The Last Wine Company, a partnership between Skybound Entertainment and Treasury Wine Estates.  “Finding new and meaningful ways to connect with consumers is something we care very much about and we think The Walking Dead wine and Living Wine Labels App are a perfect pairing.”Advertisement Linkedin Home Industry News Releases Watch the Dead Rise on the Walking Dead Wine LabelsIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessWatch the Dead Rise on the Walking Dead Wine LabelsBy Press Release – January 11, 2018 178 0 TAGSConsumerThe Walking Dead Facebook ReddIt Email Twitter Share Previous articleAfternoon Brief, January 11Next articleFrancis Ford Coppola Winery Returns as the Go-To Wine of Award Season Press Releaselast_img read more

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