The truth about ‘man flu’: Does influenza make men more miserable than women?

first_img [email protected] @sxbegle Gut Check looks at health claims made by studies, newsmakers, or conventional wisdom. We ask: Should you believe this?The claim:Men’s flu symptoms are worse than women’s, so when they complain about how much they’re suffering it’s not (just) because they’re big babies.Tell me more:“Man flu” has become an internet meme, complete with its own tongue-in-cheek website dedicated to the proposition that when men catch even a simple cold their symptoms are as bad as if they had influenza, and when they contract actual flu their symptoms are way worse than women’s.A recent study tested that hypothesis. Researchers at the University of Ottawa injected lab mice with molecules from bacteria, which mimic infection with E. coli, salmonella, legionella, and related bugs. They found “an important sex difference” in how the mice’s body temperatures responded, they reported in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity: At the onset of infection, males’ body temperature fell more than females’ did. That would seem to fit with the “man flu” idea that identical infections make males more miserable — in this case, chilled — than females. The male mice’s signs of inflammation were also worse than females’, and they seemed to huddle together more and have droopier eyelids.advertisement The mouse results, however, fall short of proving that men’s flu symptoms are worse than women’s, or that men’s mild infections are as bad as women’s serious ones. For one thing, the experiment used bacteria, not viruses; only the latter cause cold and flu, and bacterial infections are imperfect proxies for viral ones. Also, results in a few dozen mice, while a good start, don’t necessarily reveal much about human biology.More extensive evidence undercuts the notion of man flu. The most important is that immune organs such as the thymus as well as immune cells such as macrophages all have receptors for testosterone and estrogens, so those sex hormones can affect the immune system. In general, testosterone suppresses it slightly while estrogens rev it up, including by increasing the production of microbe-killing antibodies and inflammation-causing proteins. Result: When women catch a virus, their immune systems flood the zone. Related: About the Author Reprints Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. By Sharon Begley March 2, 2017 Reprints There’s no such thing as a male or female brain, study finds That might suggest that men are doomed to be more miserable when they have a flu or other viral infection, as their immune systems take a lackadaisical approach to fighting it. But no. “People think that when we get sick it’s the virus that causes our symptoms, but often those symptoms are from the immune response,” said biologist Sabra Klein of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “Cells clogging our airways, proteins causing inflammation, fever, and chills — that’s all immune response to a flu virus. And it is more common in females than males for those responses to go on too long and to be too intense. Testosterone [tamps down] the immune response, so you don’t get the exaggerated response” that intensifies symptoms.The upside of females’ more vigorous immune response is that they generally recover from infections faster than males. Might man flu be more about how long a sufferer suffers, with psychological resilience eventually crumpling in the face of day-after-day symptoms? (The male mice in the Ottawa study took an average of 48 hours to recover, compared to 24 hours for the females.)In the absence of strong physiological data supporting the notion of man flu, “you can look at psychological differences,” said immunologist Laura Haynes of the University of Connecticut, who studies age and sex differences in response to infection. “Maybe men just get whinier.”The verdict:Believers in man flu do not have physiology on their side.center_img Can a flu shot wear off if you get it too early? Perhaps, scientists say Really?Joking aside, sex and gender differences in response to infection is a lively area of research, in part because until a few years ago neither women nor female lab animals were regularly included in biomedical studies.advertisement “My data supports the idea that the man flu isn’t just a myth,” Ottawa psychology professor Nafissa Ismail said in an interview. The findings, moreover, are consistent with animal studies going back to the 1990s finding that “the intensity of infections tends to be lower in females than in males,” Ismail and colleagues wrote, possibly because of how sex hormones — testosterone in males and estrogen in females — affect the immune system. APStock Related: Gut CheckThe truth about ‘man flu’: Does influenza make men more miserable than women? Sharon Begley Tags infectious diseasemen’s healthwomen’s healthlast_img read more

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FDA’s continuing use of ‘black box’ for antidepressants ignores the harms of this warning

first_imgAntidepressants help many people fight depression. But based on a controversial review of industry studies, beginning in October 2003 the FDA issued a series of health advisories warning that children and adolescents taking antidepressants were at increased risk of suicidality. Related: [email protected] By Stephen Soumerai and Ross Koppel Aug. 29, 2018 Reprints Related: Please enter a valid email address. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Decline in diagnoses of major depressive disorderUp to half of people with depression are not treated for it; some commit suicide as a result. In a study of 55 million managed care enrollees, the FDA warnings led to an almost 40 percent reduction in the identification of adolescent patients with major depressive disorder, an important predictor of suicide. The researchers also saw a significant reduction in diagnoses among young adults.This began soon after the first FDA advisory in October 2003. It continued after the FDA black box warning for children and adolescents started in 2005 and the one for young adults began in 2007.These data appeared in a different format in Archives of General Psychiatry. They are used here with permission from lead author Anne Libby of the University of Colorado at Denver and the journal’s publisher. Decline in antidepressant useIn the years following the FDA’s first antidepressant warning in October 2003, there was a sudden, nearly 50 percent decline in the use of antidepressants among more than 400,000 poor children and adolescents in Tennessee who were covered by Medicaid. It’s hard to believe that this was not an unintended result of the warnings.These data appeared in a different format in Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. They are used here with permission from senior author William O. Cooper of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and the journal’s publisher. Reduction in psychotherapyMental health advocates hoped that any decline in antidepressant use following the FDA’s warnings would be matched by increases in face-to-face psychotherapy to treat depression and improve detection of suicidal behavior. But that didn’t happen. Psychotherapy among all patients with major depression declined after the warnings. The reduction was almost identical in adolescents and young adults.Clearly, the FDA’s recommendation that clinicians increase monitoring of patients for suicidal thoughts and behaviors did not occur.These data appeared in a different format in Archives of General Psychiatry. They are used here with permission from lead author Anne Libby of the University of Colorado at Denver and the journal’s publisher. Increase in psychotropic drug poisoningsBased on data from 11 health plans with more than 7 million people, a study we published in BMJ demonstrated two dramatic outcomes of the FDA’s antidepressant warnings and the associated publicity over a 10-year period: a sudden 31 percent reduction in antidepressant use among adolescents and a 24 percent reduction in young adults, with a simultaneous increase in poisonings due to the use of psychoactive drugs such as tranquilizers like Valium and antipsychotic drugs, a method that adolescent girls often use to attempt suicide.These were the consequences not only of reductions in medication, but also of reductions in diagnosis, psychotherapy, and monitoring, as well as a general chilling atmosphere for depression treatment created by overblown media reports of a link between antidepressant use and suicide.Reproduced with permission from lead author author Christine Lu of Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and The BMJ. Additional dataResearchers have been evaluating the impact of the FDA’s antidepressant warnings for years. A 2008 study, for example, documented possible increases in completed suicides as a result of the warnings. Earlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed that suicide attempts among teenagers have doubled in the last decade. While this research wasn’t intended to isolate the effects of the warnings, it suggests that suicide deaths increased simultaneously with the continuation of the black box warnings.Data from the National Vital Statistics Reports, June 1, 2018. There are now even more high-quality studies, some up to a decade long, from diverse environments and involving tens of millions of individuals, showing increased harm following the warnings, sometimes almost immediately. In October 2004, the FDA required a so-called “black box warning” of this risk to be printed on the labels of all antidepressant drugs. It was implemented in January 2005. Two years later, the FDA extended the same warning to include young adults, again based on industry studies. Each announcement was accompanied by a slew of media reports about the link between antidepressant use and suicide that exaggerated the danger message.advertisement The Food and Drug Administration’s “black box” warnings and advisories give important safety information about drugs. But they can sometimes go too far and harm more people than they help.Take the FDA’s highly publicized warnings that taking antidepressants increases the risk of suicidality (defined as serious thoughts about taking one’s own life or planning or attempting suicide) among children, adolescents, and young adults. We have evidence, as do many others, that these warnings have decreased youths’ access to mental health care and increased suicide attempts. So far, the FDA has refused to accept this evidence.Depression in young people is a disabling and stigmatizing illness, both in the U.S. and around the world. It is the leading cause of suicide, which climbed by about 50 percent among adolescents between 2003 and 2016.advertisement All antidepressant prescriptions still contain this frightening black box warning, and the message is repeated in TV ads.In an effort to monitor and reduce suicidality — including suicide attempts — among young people, the FDA also urged clinicians to ask about suicidal thoughts every time they prescribed antidepressants to a young person.The FDA was undoubtedly acting with good intentions. But the warnings reduced the use of both antidepressants and talk therapy among young persons with depression, with the unwanted consequences of reducing its diagnosis and treatment. This was followed rapidly by an increase in suicidal behavior.There’s no question that antidepressants can cause harm if used inappropriately. But the FDA failed to recognize — and still won’t acknowledge — that the harms of its public advisories and black box warning on antidepressants for young people more than outweigh the benefits. The evidence is strong that:the warnings stopped many adolescents and young adults from seeking care for depressionmany of those with depression didn’t seek help and so did not receive effective drug treatmentpsychotherapy and other mental health visits declinedsuicide attempts increasedWe used a simple and clear way to measure the effects of these antidepressant warnings. Called the interrupted-time-series design, this rigorous method graphically displays how the warnings resulted in sudden and harmful breaks from existing trends. Tags FDAmental healthpediatricspharmaceuticalspublic health About the Authors Reprints @StephenSoumerai Stephen Soumerai Companies are racing to develop fast-acting depression drugs — but the process is tricky It’s time to rethink the warningThe FDA knows that drug warnings are seldom totally harmless, and it carefully weighs the tradeoffs. The antidepressant warnings may have made sense to the FDA at the time, though critics have long charged that the data on which the FDA based the warnings are flawed. But the body of evidence that has been accumulated since then overwhelms the analysis that prompted the FDA’s decisions.The risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors and suicide attempts among youths, adolescents, and young adults due to taking antidepressants was never as high as the risk due to untreated depression.Yet just this spring, an FDA representative, rather than admitting the error, dismissed the effects of the warnings on antidepressant use in an article in the journal Medical Care, ignoring the threat to the mental health of young people.It’s time for the FDA to acknowledge this miscalculation. Going forward, FDA policymakers should consider working with researchers who study the antidepressant black box warning about suicide. Because it continues to dampen effective drug and non-drug treatment and monitoring for depression — and because teen suicide attempts are accelerating — it’s appropriate to think about removing this warning.Stephen Soumerai is professor of population medicine, founding and former director of the Division of Health Policy and Insurance Research, and teaches research methods at Harvard Medical School. Ross Koppel is adjunct professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is also a senior fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute, the Institute of Biomedical Informatics, and the Center for Public Health Initiatives. Caitlin Lupton, an administrative specialist for the Division of Health Policy and Insurance Research, created the graphs for this article. Privacy Policy [email protected] Patients who have had suicidal thoughts are often excluded from antidepressant trials. The FDA says they don’t need to be Ross Koppel Paxil and other antidepressants carry a black box warning, the most serious type of warning in prescription drug labeling. Joe Raedle/Getty Images Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. First OpinionFDA’s continuing use of ‘black box’ for antidepressants ignores the harms of this warning last_img read more

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Ratheniska get the better of Killeshin to claim Division 1 Girls Shield

first_imgHome GAA Cumann na mBunscol Ratheniska get the better of Killeshin to claim Division 1 Girls Shield GAACumann na mBunscolSport GAA WhatsApp By LaoisToday Reporter – 23rd October 2019 TAGSCumann na mBunscol 2019 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleCuddy the hero as Paddock claim Roinn 3 Boys Shield titleNext articlePictures: Athy Tennis Club host Match Maker Tournament LaoisToday Reporter Facebook Pinterest Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Ratheniska Girls Kileshin 1-6 Ratheniska 3-6Roinn 1 Girls Shield FinalRatheniska got the better of Killeshin to claim Division 1 Shield glory in the penultimate game of Day 1 of the Cumann na mBunscol football finals for 2019.Clodagh Fingleton’s first half goals proved crucial for Ratheniska who built up a lead that they held onto until full time.Killeshin started the game really well with points from Ciara Millton and Cara English to ease them into an early lead. Ratheniska get the better of Killeshin to claim Division 1 Girls Shieldcenter_img Facebook Twitter Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Twitter WhatsApp GAA But Ratheniska’s response was deadly as Clodagh Fingleton, with virtually their first attack, blasted through to score the game’s opening goal.Emily Doody and Issey Bailey added further points before Ciara Millton’s second point kept Killeshin in touch.But Ratheniska finished the half very strongly as Fingleton crashed home a second goal while Lilly Bailey and Mary O’Hara added points to leave Ratheniska 2-4 to 0-3 ahead at half time.Issey Bailey extended their lead on the resumption of play while a Ciara Millton free got Killeshin underway for the second half.The same player then rattled the net for Killeshin after a great pass by Paige Brennan but Issey Bailey went straight down the other end and notched Ratheniska’s third goal after 37 minutes.Killeshin kept going right to the end with Ciara Millton adding two more points but Ratheniska were in charge and Issey Bailey’s late free point completed the win.Killeshin GirlsSCORERS – Killeshin: Ciara Millton 1-5 (one free), Cara English 0-1 Ratheniska: Clodagh Fingleton 2-0, Emily Doody 0-1, Issey Bailey 1-4 (one free), Lilly Bailey 0-1,Killeshin: Eleana Rice; Mollie O’Neill, Emma Malone, Amy Heffernan, Katie Lowry, Paige Brennan, Gaby Hutton, Cara English, Siobhan Doran, Ciara Milton, Ashlee Smith. Subs: Leah Westgate, Tori Walsh, Tara Dowling, Zoe Brennan, Ellie Brennan, Ava Mulleney, Adelle Power, Laura Hennessy, Leona McGrath, Kate Keogh, Aoibhinn Brennan, Alanna Sirr, Rachel Doogue, Ayla Denn, Amber Kelly, Coaimhe Brennan, Maria Fitzgerald, Shannon DunneRatheniska: Ava Laffan; Ly Grace, Caoimhe Fingleton, Aine Nolan, Poppy Duff, Emily Doody, Chloe Troy, Issey Bailey, Lilly Bailey, Mary O’Hara, Clodagh Fingleton. Subs: Noelle Swords, Kim Ly, Anna Rafter, Maryum Rajaullah, Mia Downey, Maeve Kelly, Kate Kavanagh, Katie MaherSEE ALSO – The fixtures for Cumann na mBunscol Football finals 2019 have been announced Pinterest GAA 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

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SEC adopts rule for compensation committees and advisors

Share this article and your comments with peers on social media AMF says Bombardier exec compensation plan falls within the law FSB consults on compensation tools to address misconduct Facebook LinkedIn Twitter U.S. securities regulators are going to be requiring stock exchanges to set listing standards that impose requirements on public company compensation committees. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has approved a rule that requires exchange listing standards to address: the independence of the members on a compensation committee; the committee’s authority to retain compensation advisers; its consideration of the independence of any compensation advisers; and, the committee’s responsibility for appointing, paying, and overseeing compensation advisers. James Langton Exec failed to disclose perks to shareholders: SEC Keywords Executive compensationCompanies Securities and Exchange Commission Related news “This rule will help to enhance the board’s decision-making process on executive compensation matters, particularly the selection, engagement and oversight of compensation advisors, and will provide more transparency with respect to conflicts of interest of consultants engaged by boards,” said SEC chairman, Mary Schapiro. The SEC also amended its proxy disclosure rules to require new disclosures from companies about their use of compensation consultants and conflicts of interest. The new rule and rule amendments will take effect in 30 days. read more

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Woodlands Primary Receives Facelift

first_imgRelatedWoodlands Primary Receives Facelift Woodlands Primary Receives Facelift UncategorizedSeptember 11, 2008 RelatedWoodlands Primary Receives Facelift Advertisementscenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Woodlands Primary School in Cross Keys, Manchester, has received a facelift, carried out by persons on the Inmates Public Work Programme, which is administered by the Ministry of National Security.Speaking at a re-dedication ceremony held at the school yesterday (September 9), State Minister in the Ministry of National Security, Senator Arthur Williams, said the current phase of the programme was carefully structured to prevent persons from escaping.“It was built on a vision that our prisons should not be merely places of punishment, but in fact institutions of rehabilitation for offenders. And that vision is what guided the Inmates Public Work Programme. In the past we have had persons escaping while doing work at public facilities, but this time we carefully selected those inmates that are best suited to carry out public works; and in this new phase we have not had one person escaping. The programme is going well, we have various skills in the prisons and what we need now is public support,” Mr. Williams said.He added that the programme is a very important feature of rehabilitating inmates. “It is not only a means of putting prisoners to work, it is an important feature of rehabilitation of those people who we have in our care. We can’t afford to let them out in the same way that they came in, and have them repeat the same wrongs, so we have to find ways of truly rehabilitating them. Many of them came as illiterates, and it is our duty to educate and teach them the value of work. Success in this programme will see a transformed set of individuals who, despite the circumstances that put them behind bars, they would have been equipped to be builders of this country,” he stated.Work at the school included painting of the building and fixtures, with paint donated by Brighton Engineering Limited, and general cleaning and bushing of the surrounding. It was done in time for the start of the new academic year. RelatedWoodlands Primary Receives Faceliftlast_img read more

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The real dark side of the moon

first_img Seminar Abstract:A common misconception in astronomy is that part of the Moon remains continuously shadowed, popularized by legendary rock band Pink Floyd’s 1973 album, “Dark Side of the Moon.” Watching the Moon change phases confirms that, in fact, there is no dark side – all sides see the Sun at different times during the month. Yet, a peculiar feature of the lunar orbit produces shadows in craters at its poles, which have remained in darkness for billions of years. So, there really is a dark side of the Moon!What surprises lurk within the Moon’s perpetual shadows? Recent observations from orbiting spacecraft such as NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Indian Chandrayaan-1 mission have revealed the presence of vast ice deposits, which may provide rocket fuel and drinking water for astronauts on future deep space missions. Scientific interest in these ice deposits is also high: they may record a billion-year history of comet impacts, solar wind, and perhaps even a short-lived lunar atmosphere produced by volcanic eruptions.In this presentation, Dr. Hayne will take us on a journey to the coldest, darkest reaches of our Solar System – the Moon’s permanently shadowed craters. Here, we will find remnants of the Moon’s violent past. We will also discuss LASP’s involvement in NASA’s upcoming lunar exploration program, including the recently announced Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, and CubeSat missions such as Lunar Flashlight. Published on September 18, 2018 Events Calendar Public Lectures Special Events Seminars for Scientists Magnetosphere Seminars Non-LASP Seminars Public Lectures The Real Dark Side of the Moon About Leadership Features & News Events & Seminarscenter_img Speaker:Paul Hayne Date:Wednesday, Oct 03, 2018 Time:7:30 PM Location:LSTB-299 (1234 Innovation Drive) Publications CU Students at LASP Jobs LASP Tours Address & Directions Visitor Information Contact Acknowledgments Giving to LASP Scholarships and Fellowships LASP Staff Personnel Pages 2020-20212019-20202018-20192017-20182016-20172015–20162014–20152013-20142012-20132011-20122010-20112009-20102008-20092007-2008last_img read more

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Arrow&Branch Moves to Wheeler Farms Winery

first_imgReddIt By Editor – May 2, 2017 87 0 AdvertisementWinemaking and tasting at new St. Helena facilityNapa Valley, May 2017 —-  Steve and Seanne Contursi, the founders and proprietors of Arrow&Branch, announce that Arrow&Branch will now be making wine and welcoming clients at the spectacular new Wheeler Farms Winery located in the heart of St. Helena on Zinfandel Lane as of May 1. “The historical property has been re-created and re-envisioned by the Araujo family as a state-of-the-art winery providing cutting edge technology and equipment. It is the perfect spot for making our limited production, distinctive handcrafted lots,” Contursi said, in making the announcement.Arrow&Branch will begin conducting private tastings at the newly open Wheeler Farms Winery Hospitality House. Each tasting will be hosted by the winery’s General Manager, Elizabeth Robertis. “We look forward to welcoming our clients to this beautiful new spot, not only to enjoy stunning views of vineyards and orchards on the Valley floor in St. Helena but of course also to indulge in our current releases,” Contursi adds.Visits will be scheduled for 90 minutes in one of the winery’s exclusive tasting areas and must be arranged by reservation only, in advance. The experience will include a walk through the 11.6 acres of handsome grounds which encompass Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc vineyards, 80 olive trees, 21 heritage fruit trees, two bee hives, 13 raised beds for vegetables and a chicken coop housing heritage chickens. The tasting is priced at $125 per person and will include a taste of all four of Arrow&Branch’s current releases. Wheeler Farms is located at 588 Zinfandel Lane in St. Helena.Wheeler Farms Winery, the latest project from Bart and Daphne Araujo, was designed by architects Taylor Lombardo to express the agricultural history of the property. It includes a state of the art custom crush facility and an inviting hospitality space.Arrow&Branch’s current releases are 2013 Arrow&Branch Cabernet Sauvignon from Beckstoffer Dr. Crane Vineyard, 2016 Arrow&Branch Sauvignon Blanc, 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon “Black Label” and the Flagship 2013 Red Wine. The winery also offers The Arrow&Branch Society, with three tiers of membership and exclusive benefits.         Founded in 2008 by Steve and Seanne Contursi, Arrow&Branch creates wines from small hand crafted lots of some of the best Napa Valley vineyards including the Contursis’ estate Cabernet Franc vineyard in Coombsville.  The Contursis purchased the 3.5 acre estate vineyard in 2007 and added 1.5 contiguous acres in 2011. Jennifer Williams is the winemaker. Mike Wolf is the vineyard manager and farms the vineyards organically. Vineyard tours of the estate are available by appointment only.Arrow&Branch was chosen as the name for the Contursis’ winery as a reference to numismatics. Steve Contursi has been a professional numismatist since 1975 and specializes in historically significant, museum quality U.S. coins. Found on the reverse of most United States coinage is an eagle holding an olive branch and arrows in its talons. The Arrow&Branch name pays homage to both U.S. coinage and Americana.One of Arrow&Branch’s unusual distinguishing touches is that each wine’s label includes a favorite quote from Benjamin Franklin including Mind your business and Diligence is the mother of all good luck.  “The true connection of Benjamin Franklin to Arrow&Branch is that he designed the first coin with a true Americana motif in 1776, known as the Continental Dollar. It’s on this coin that his famous quote “Mind Your Business” is prominently featured,” explains Contursi. “This is the motto of Arrow&Branch,” he adds.The conjoined spacing between “Arrow” and “Branch” and the ampersand are design elements of the wines’ labels.Advertisement TAGSArrow&BranchConsumerWheeler Farms Winery Home Industry News Releases Arrow&Branch Moves to Wheeler Farms WineryIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessArrow&Branch Moves to Wheeler Farms Winery Share Emailcenter_img Pinterest Twitter Linkedin Facebook Previous articleAfternoon Brief, May 2Next articleThird Annual SF Cheese Fest Celebrates Local Cheesemakers and Cheese Lovers at “Melting Together” Editorlast_img read more

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Bar sections respond to COVID-19 and prepare for the recovery

first_imgBar sections respond to COVID-19 and prepare for the recovery May 04, 2020 By Jim Ash Senior Editor Top Stories Closing courthouses and law offices and slowing the economy, COVID-19 has been a universal threat to the legal community.But to Florida Bar sections and divisions, the pandemic has brought challenges — and opportunities — as varied as the specialties they serve.The Business Law Section, one of the largest and arguably one of the most impacted, worked quickly to put its long reach and organizational strength to work, said Chair Jay Brown.“We already have free CLE’s,” Brown said. “The Bar asked us to do a one-hour CLE, and we’re at three and growing,” he said.On April 3, the Executive Council voted unanimously to create a “COVID-19 Pandemic Recovery Task Force.”Co-chaired by Bart Valdes and Detra Shaw-Wilder, the taskforce includes some 30 members, including judges, legal scholars, and experts with a variety of talent and experience.The mission is deliberately broad, but forward looking, Brown said.“We call it the recovery taskforce, because we view it as we’re going to get out of this thing, and that’s the way it’s going to be,” Brown said. “The group that rallied for the taskforce has really done a great job getting content posted and trying to create a hub of resources.”Beginning with “Advocacy and Technology Tips When Working from Home During COVID-19,” the task force website boasts an impressive list of content that continues to grow.One of the most sobering listings is a live, May 7 webinar, “Business Litigation in Crisis: Contract Enforceability, Business Interruption and Inverse Condemnation in the Wake of COVID-19.”Just as ominous sounding is an invitation to the webinar, “Business UNusual: A Practical Overview of Bankruptcy in Florida Amidst COVID-19.”Business Law Section members are expecting an avalanche of legal disputes as unemployment skyrockets, businesses fail, and untold contractual obligations go unfulfilled. Bankruptcy filings and foreclosures are already climbing, Brown said.“We’ve never seen anything like this, and as far as impact, we don’t know yet, because we’re still in the midst of it,” he said.Section leaders are focusing on triage, he said.“We’re working with the legal aid organizations and The Florida Bar Foundation to try and be a resource for them,” Brown said. “As we know, there are going to be a lot of people that are in need.”The task force website links to an ABA “Model Standstill/Tolling Agreement” that proposes a brief pause in litigating contractual and other disputes.“Mass foreclosures would be economically suicidal,” the ABA authors state.Brown said he agrees with the concept wholeheartedly, but “getting all of the parties to agree could be difficult.”“Hopefully you’ll see parties counseled by their lawyers to say, hey, consider doing something like a standstill, or, let’s even work harder to find solutions and not have to involve the court, which would probably be to nobody’s benefit at the end of the day,” he said.Health LawThe Health Law Section’s 1,600 members, who mostly represent clients in the health care and insurance industry, have been rushing to meet client demands, said Chair Everett Wilson.“One of the busier types of attorneys in a health-care crisis is a health-care attorney,” Wilson said. “A lot of our clients, across an entire industry, have had to take immediate action, and none of them, really, fall outside of essential services.”At the same time, Everett said, section leaders have had to scramble to postpone CLE events that were scheduled for April, a logistical headache and an added complication in a section that serves its members so exclusively.“The only place to get Florida substantive health law CLE is typically through us,” he said. “While there’s a lot of national programs, they don’t touch on Florida law.”Section members have had to help their health-care provider clients navigate a blizzard of changing regulations while guiding them through the application process for billions of dollars in congressionally authorized stimulus funds, Wilson said.And health-care providers are often the largest employers in any given community, raising more issues, Wilson said.“On the labor and employment front, a lot of employees don’t want to show up, but because they’re an essential service, they’re not furloughed,” he said. “There’s the law, but you have to be sensitive.”Wilson recalls advising health-care executives at the beginning of the crisis.“I’m telling them, look, there’s changes in these laws, what are you doing when people show up at the emergency room, just real practical type of advice, and the CEO interrupts and says, ‘Everett, my biggest issue right now is getting protective equipment, forget ventilators.’”Many health-care providers are switching to telemedicine, raising a host of regulatory issues, such as prescribing controlled substances, Wilson said.“During the first two weeks, the things that came up were the prior laws and various exemptions from that, and very little clarity coming from the various authorities,” he said. “Fortunately, the governmental authorities have provided some clarification on that.”While lawyers across Florida are worried about a souring economy and its impact on their livelihoods, Health Law Section members have been working harder than ever, Wilson said.Section leaders will be helping members deal with the immediate demands of the COVID-19 crisis, but more thorough content will be developed that is forward-looking, according to Wilson.“Because of the timing, they’re going to be more related to exiting the crisis,” he said.Public Interest Law SectionThe Public Interest Law Section is one of the smallest, but that hasn’t stopped section leaders from moving quickly to provide valuable content for 350 members, said Chair Ericka Garcia.The section is sponsoring a May 7 webinar, “COVID-19, Landlords and Tenants: Housing Law During COVID-19.”Largely made up of public defenders, prosecutors, and legal aid lawyers, the section expects its clients, many of them indigent or low-income, to bear the brunt of the economic fallout.“Housing is going to be a big issue,” she said.Since public schools switched to online instruction, some transgender youth are reporting problems with the way the platforms identify them to their peers, Garcia said.“Their classmates may have not known that they legally had a different name, it’s kind of like being outed,” Garcia said, stressing that the problem is technical, and not the fault of school districts.PILS members have been trading information about court procedures for such things as dependency hearings, and tips on how to prepare indigent clients for online hearings, Garcia said.As CEO of Collaborative Justice Partners, a national consultant for legal aid societies, Garcia said she is seeing a decrease in legal aid traffic across the nation since the COVID-19 crisis began.But that is expected to change in the coming months, Garcia said, after clients deal with the immediate fallout. That’s usually the way disasters work in legal aid, she said.“It takes a little while for legal aid clients to show up at legal aid, because first, it’s survival, finding food and water, you think about safety.”Family Law SectionAlthough she admits a personal bias, Family Law Section Chair Amy Hamlin makes a strong argument that COVID-19 has impacted her section the most.“Every single person in the state is part of a family in some shape or form,” she said. “We have really tried hard to pivot, to change and adapt, to help our members and the clients they serve get through this.”Hamlin says social distancing mandates have kept the section’s 4,000 members scrambling to keep up with administrative orders and guidelines that vary from circuit to circuit and sometimes within circuits.“We’re getting a lot of questions regarding parenting plans, how do we time share during COVID-19?” she said. “That was a huge question everyone around the state was having.”Stimulus payments pose another dilemma for family lawyers, she said.“Maybe the account for their 2018 return was closed, so then it’s going to be mail, what address does it get mailed to?” she asked. “Or if it was deposited into an account that was joint in the 2018 tax return, it’s no longer joint, how does the other person get their money, are they entitled to get any money?”The section has tried to focus on helping members and their clients deal with such things as working from home while schools are closed.“To that end, we have put together pretty quickly a bunch of Facebook live posts on a wide range of topics, how to work from home, how to use Zoom, how to take care of yourself and your clients,” Hamlin said. “We have so many clients and lawyers with special needs kids, how to work from home and meet those needs.”Labor and Employment Law SectionLabor and Employment Law Section Chair David Adams said the section quickly posted two webinars to help its approximately 2,000 members navigate the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, and other federal relief that followed.“I don’t need to tell you this, but these stimulus bills were sausage making at their very best,” he said. “They were quickly put together and the Original Family First Coronavirus Act bill was 888 pages.”Adams said section Secretary Scott Atwood, Legal Education Director Sacha Dyson, and immediate past Chair Cathleen Scott deserve much of the credit for producing the material.Section members, and their employer clients, had to decide such thorny questions such as how to accurately award paid time off, Adams said.“These laws were very specific about whether employers could force their workers to use PTO, or not force them to use PTO, and we’re trying to get the word out on that,” he said.While dealing with his section responsibilities, Adams also submitted stimulus applications for his 10-lawyer firm in Southwest Florida. The application was successful, Adams said.“We’re happy to say that we haven’t let anyone go,” he said. “But it’s a challenge to turn all this stuff around and make it work.”Adams belongs to a local group of business executives that meets regularly, and the outlook for the near future isn’t encouraging.“We have a small group and we get together once a month, and we have bankers and lawyers and insurance people and brokers, and the consensus from the group is maybe 20% to 25% of businesses are going to fail, it’s kind of scary.”Criminal Law SectionCriminal Law Section Chair Jennifer Zedalis said COVID-19 has slowed the wheels of justice, and that’s having a big impact on her members.“Criminal law is fast moving, because you’ve got the issue of clients who are incarcerated, or at risk of being incarcerated, and at risk of losing their liberty and their livelihood,” she said.COVID-19 has also touched the very foundations of criminal law, raising new questions about balancing the need to protect society and the rights of the accused at a time when jailing a suspect before trial, or sentencing a non-violent offender to prison, could be a death sentence.“If you’re serving a prison term because of a non-violent, third-degree felony, if you have asthma, what if you have a compromised immune system, do you deserve the death penalty?” Zedalis asked. “I don’t think so.”Some section members are concerned about appearing in court and risking infection with a deadly virus, Zedalis said.“One of my colleagues, he and his wife are expecting a child, and he wants to be really careful, so he didn’t want to take cases in a county where you would have to appear live,” she said.While the section is working hard to continue CLE programs and other member service, COVID-19 has taken a toll on one of the section’s most cherished traditions, Zedalis said.“I think this is the first year ever I’ve had to cancel the prosecutor-public defender trial training program, which I believe is going into its 43rd year,” she said.last_img read more

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ITU appoints first high level female executive

first_imgHome ITU appoints first high level female executive The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) appointed former US telecom official Doreen Bogdan-Martin (pictured) as director of its development bureau, making her the first woman elected to one of the ITU’s top five leadership positions in the organisation’s 153-year history.Bogdan-Martin joined the ITU in 1993, serving as head of its regulatory reform unit from 2003 to 2007 and chief of strategic planning and membership since 2008. She previously worked as a telecommunication policy specialist at the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) from 1989 to 1993.NTIA administrator David Redl in a statement praised Bogdan-Martin as “immensely qualified”, noting her presence will “give the United States a voice in ITU leadership for the first time in three decades”.US VP Mike Pence tweeted “her leadership will make sure new information technologies benefit all people and nations”.In her application for the director position, Bogdan-Martin said she will focus on “working to bring online the remaining 3.9 billion people still offline,” implement big data analytics, and modernise training courses and publications to make them “more useful and accessible” to decision makers in both the public and private sectors.ITU is an agency of the United Nations responsible for allocating global radio spectrum, developing technical standards to ensure network interoperability and increasing access to communications technologies around the globe. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 02 NOV 2018 Diana Goovaerts ITUNTIAUnited Nations Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more Previous ArticleAgcom provokes Iliad ire over licence extensionsNext ArticleInstagram trials Stories promotion feature Tags US government mulls programme to boost open 5G Related Author Mobile industry reaches climate action breakthrough ITU calls for rural coverage actionlast_img read more

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Coram Distillery Unveils New Wheatfish Whiskey

first_imgCORAM – The three friends who run the Glacier Distilling Company in Coram asked themselves a question after opening last year: What would happen if you tried to turn a great local beer into a great local whiskey? The answer came last Friday inside the red Whiskey Barn on U.S. Highway 2 East. Members from Glacier Distilling and Whitefish-based Great Northern Brewing Company teamed up to bottle the results of their partnership – the Wheatfish Whiskey. The two companies worked together over the last year to create a custom blend of the popular Wheatfish beer that was distilled into a 90-proof whiskey. After being aged in oak barrels for almost nine months, the liquor was unveiled on March 9. The new whiskey joins four other liquors that are sold at Glacier Distillery. The partnership with Great Northern was a natural one. Ever since the distillery began operating in January 2011, Nicolas Lee, Danny McIntosh and Lauren Oscilowski have nurtured the “Drink Local” mindset. “We wanted to make it a joint spirit. That’s the whole ‘drink local’ idea,” McIntosh said. “This really shows off their beer and shows off our distilling methods and whiskeys.” Lee and McIntosh worked with Joe Barberis, the head brewer at Great Northern, to create the custom blend of Wheatfish that would translate to a nice liquor. The Wheatfish Whiskey was fermented in local wheat and barley, and the result is what Lee describes as a sweet and slightly spicy whiskey. “This is my favorite whiskey we have,” Lee said. “And it just has a really unique story behind it … I think it’s a really nice spirit.” “The blend of grains will just give a nice mellowness and different flavor to the whiskey,” Barberis said, adding, “I always thought this would be a cool idea.” Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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