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90s Movie Bomb Satirized in Musical in the Mission

first_img 0% Misogyny, gratuitous nudity, exploitation and betrayal might not seem like key ingredients for a comedic piece of musical theater to arrive on the stage of a San Francisco theater, but Showgirls! The Musical is exactly that and relishes its campy, horrific origins.The musical, already a runaway hit in New York, makes its West Coast debut at the Victoria Theater on August 10. It’s a satirical adaptation of the 1995 film Showgirls, the story of a young woman who goes to Vegas to become a star showgirl and stripper – at great personal cost.But here’s the thing – the musical, through the alchemy of theatrical irreverence, turns all the awfulness of the movie into a comedic show that stars a drag queen and helped a key actress work through her own experience with sexual assault. How?Well, for one thing, the film has long been embraced by people as campy ridiculousness that should be laughed at – most notably by Joshua Grannell, who, as his alter ego Peaches Christ, has been screening the film and accompanying it with deliciously outrageous drag shows for some 18 years. Tags: theater • things to do Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%center_img “If a drag queen could be a movie, it would be Showgirls,” Grannell said. “It’s extreme and offensive and outrageous and hilarious and campy and wonderfully over-the-top.”The screenings were a hit – along with the free lap dances that came with each order of a large popcorn. (The lap dances will make an appearance at the musical version as well, but since the musical is a full-length show, they must be limited, and a precious three will be auctioned off to be enjoyed during intermission.)Peaches Christ will also appear at Humphry Slocombe on Saturday  from 1 to 3 p.m., where the ice cream makers have created a special “Peaches and Popcorn” flavor specifically to celebrate the musical’s West Coast premiere.New York’s MediumFace Productions also saw the film as ripe for ridicule in 2013, and the musical became a reinvention of the film with an entirely different message. A year ago, Grannell reached out to MediumFace to help set a West Coast show in motion, complete with a full band, and live cast, a complete departure from screening the film.“It’s awful stuff. It’s women treating each other terribly. At face value it’s misogyny homophobia and politically incorrect,” Grannell explained. “But because of who is presenting it and how it’s being presented, we’re laughing at all those things and making fun of those things.”For April Kidwell, who played the lead role of Nomi Malone, desperate to become a naked star of the stage, the show even became therapy.“Going into this, I was raped earlier that year,” Kidwell said. “[It was] most challenging experience of my life, and Showgirls in particular was this godsend. It was this auspicious, deeply spiritual cathartic release for me.”Today, five years after the attack, Kidwell is in a better place — thanks partially to therapy, but also thanks in part to facing and processing her own trauma through a character who had experienced the same.“It helped, it’s had a significant profound impact on my healing experience,” she said. “I am a complete testimony to the healing power of art.”The show is raunchy and ostentatious and “not for the easily offended,” as Grannell put it. But there is an undertone of respect and mutual support and joy to it all.For one thing, proceeds from the lap dances to be auctioned off will go to the Shanti Project, a charity that supports people living with terminal illnesses.“It’s an across the board tradition in drag culture to raise money and to help folks that I’m proud to be part of,” Grannell said. “I don’t know the psychology there other than we’re folks who were beat up and understand the need to be brave.”And while she and others in the cast spend a significant amount of time almost completely naked, Kidwell described the theater as a kind of safe haven.“I’ve noticed a special bond with all of the cast members. There’s this element of nudity, and there’s never been any cattiness,” she said. “We all truly have each others’ backs because we’re all in this very vulnerable position regarding our bodies.”Plus, the stars (of the show) are in alignment.“This woman is a spectacle. If you thought Elizabeth Berkley was over the top in the movie, just wait,” Grannell said of Kidwell.“Peaches is a really nurturing and compassionate leader and very humble person and it’s been a joyous experience thus far,” Kidwell said.Funny, because the trait Grannell said he most identified with in Cristal Connors, the mentor showgirl Kidwell’s character eventually pushes down the stairs in the film, is that she is “the wicked villain.” As the venerable Peaches, Grannell is watching and waiting for the next brilliant queen to shove him out of the limelight.“She’s the older showgirl who has to watch out for the younger ingenue ready to push her down the stairs…As someone who’s been doing drag in San Francisco for 20 years it’s very relatable for me,” he said.But what does he do when he spots such a young up and coming talent?“Typically my way to deal with that is to be inspired by them and then cast them in my shows,” he said. “I think it’s better to embrace them than to fear them.”Showgirls! The Musical runs at the Victoria Theatre from August 10 to August 27. Peaches Christ is also slated to make an appearance at Humphry Slocombe on Saturday, August 6, from 1 to 3 p.m., where the ice cream makers have created a special “Peaches and Popcorn” flavor specifically to celebrate the musical’s West Coast premiere. Tickets to the show are available here. last_img read more

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Neighborhood notes Dolores Parks bridge and bottles new development etc

first_img 0% Dolores Park Bridge: Remove or Modify? At a Mission Dolores Neighborhood Association meeting, Mission Station Captain Bill Griffin, District 8 Supervisor Jeff Sheehy and a representative from Parks and Rec told a small room of attendees that they are drafting plans to modify the 19th Street bridge at Dolores Park in response to a shooting that occurred on the bridge on Aug. 3. The officials said they are planning to install lights, cameras and signs on the bridge, and have definite plans with the Department of Public Works to erase the bridge’s graffiti by Sept. 21. Those plans seemed to prevail over an earlier suggestion by Parks and Rec Director Phil Ginsburg that the bridge be removed.   “We’re not going to take it out, because it’s historic,” Sheehy said. “We shouldn’t be taking out parts of San Francisco.”An earlier version of this story attributed the quote about the Dolores Park bridge to Captain Bill Griffin. It should have been attributed to Supervisor Jeff Sheehy. Our apologies. Dolores Park littering fee held in committee, glass ban moves ahead We’re not being singled out. The Board of Supervisors will vote on Tuesday to ban glass bottles in most parks citywide. Good luck. You know how that has worked out in Dolores Park, where they are already banned. Also, a $1,000 fine for littering in Dolores Park, which was originally part of the package, was dropped in the Public Safety and Neighborhood Services committee. Supervisor Jane Kim’s Fees and Fines task force group is studying the issue.If approved by the board, glass bottles would be banned. The fines? They remain $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second and $500 for the third. As previously noted, fines are rarely levied, so it’s unclear if this will be any more effective than the littering fines, which were also rarely levied. And this, too, raises the question: alcohol is banned from Dolores Park. But is now permitted in cans? Mmmm. 45 Units on 14th and Stevenson awaiting approval A project comprising 45 units, roughly 5,700 square feet of retail and some 50 “maker space” workshops could be coming to 14th and Stevenson streets, if approved by the planning commission in November. The project is being developed by MX3 Ventures, with BAR as the architect. The parking ratio would be .75. The project would include 16 percent affordable housing.The project would be built on a parking lot at 14th and Stevenson streets. Hold on to your hat for more news on this — it won’t go before the board until early November. Local author wins international awardJorge Argueta y Holly Ayala.[check]At the International Latino Book Awards, Jorge Argueta, a local poet and bookstore owner, won Best Children Fiction Picture Book in the Bilingual category for Somos como las nubes / We are like the clouds. You can read more here. Or you can go up to and visit Jorge and his wife Holly at Luna’s Press & Bookstore at 3790 Mission St. and buy the book. We’ll be inviting him soon for our radio program, which airs on Thursday mornings. Casa Sanchez wins legacy businessMayor Ed Lee named chips-and-salsa company Casa Sanchez the city’s 100th legacy business this week. The designation makes Casa Sanchez eligible for an annual grant of $500 per employee, as well as a $4.50-per-square-foot incentive to the company’s landlord to extend its lease to 10 years.  Congrats, Casa Sanchez!Fiesta on Sunday Calle 24 will be holding the Fiesta de las Américas along the 24th Street corridor on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be loads of entertainment and activities for all. We will see you there.Closings and OpeningsTwo-year-old True Modern at 455 Valencia St. will close in a couple of weeks. Meanwhile, there’s a big sale going on. They will close the brick-and-mortar store, according to someone at the shop, but will be online. Meanwhile, right next door, clothing store Everlane continues its renovation of what was formerly ArtZone461. Photo by Lydia ChávezMergers and AcquisitionsFinally, as you’ve all probably heard by now, Nestle is now the major stakeholder in Blue Bottle. Will the coffee now taste corporate?And this just in, from SoMa Arts on Day of the Dead:Chosen by father and son curators René & Rio Yañez, this year’s theme, Remembrance and Resistance, emphasizes the importance of mourning in the context of resistance struggles.Courtesy, SoMa Arts center_img Tags: neighborhood notes Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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City of San Francisco threatens to eject 50 massage therapists from Mission

first_imgCandace Combs, a longtime massage therapist in San Francisco and president of the Mission Creek Merchants Association, accused ActivSpace’s management of misleading its masseuse tenants about the legality of running their businesses out of the building. She’s rallying the displaced bodyworkers to fight back against the city. ActivSpace representatives didn’t respond to requests for comment. Morales said the building’s owners aren’t communicating with city officials, either. The situation dates back to a series of city laws approved over the past several years. While they were designed to crack down on sex work and human trafficking, they often took aim at massage businesses overall. One of those laws restricted where massage therapists could set up shop, including an attempt to keep them away from PDR zones, Morales said. In a memo from the Department of Public Health, dated Jan. 22, 2019, all body workers in the ActivSpace building were notified that they had 40 days to obtain a health permit that would allow them to continue operations, or to discontinue their services at that location. “Beginning in May of 2017, new massage uses were no longer permitted in the City’s industrial PDR-G-1 zoning districts,” said the memo, signed by city health inspector Rochelle Veloso. DPH sent the notices after receiving a complaint “regarding possible illegal massage establishments at this location,” said DPH spokesperson Veronica Vien. “Any enforcement would be the result of investigating the complaint.”Massage therapist Jae Greenman said she’s one of 52 people now looking for new digs after receiving the notice. She began co-leasing an office in ActivSpace last summer, and said there was no indication from the building’s management that bodyworkers weren’t allowed to operate there. “As far as I knew, I was legal. I have a business license, insurance, I’m above board on everything,” Greenman said. “This blindsided us.”As of Friday, the website for ActivSpace’s Mission District location says, “Unfortunately, we can no longer lease space to massage therapists due to zoning usage restrictions.” However, a copy of the website viewed at archive.org, which was last archived on June 23, 2018, does not feature this language. And, on the building’s “frequently asked questions” page today, it says, “Most all activities that are not prohibited by law or ordinance are allowed at ActivSpace. … Specifically prohibited activities include, but are not limited to, residential use, welding, motor vehicle repair and storage, cannabis-based businesses, barbershops and salons, spray tanning booths, brewing/distilling and mass production activities.” Massage and bodywork are not mentioned. Combs noted that the city’s move puts dozens of small businesses at risk — many of them owned by women. ActivSpace’s offices are one of the last affordable city options for entrepreneurs like Greenman; one tenant who was recently seeking someone to take over his ActivSpace lease said that he was paying $840 a month for a nine-by-13-foot office. Finding suitable space elsewhere in the city is prohibitively expensive, as is permitting, which costs $1,200 up front and another $600 a year, Greenman said. While massage therapists can often find work with spas and other wellness services, they often make a lot less money than when they work directly with clients, she said.“As a result of these notices, I am moving out of the building. Presently, I cannot perform massage in San Francisco and have to tell my clients that I will be unable to provide service for two or three months,” said massage therapist Wendell JaL Andrus. “The process for getting approved to practice is also costly. For the next few months I will have to figure out how to live with no income and no way to earn a living.”Ronen is meeting with displaced tenants next week to brainstorm some ways of keeping them at ActivSpace until a longer-term solution can be arranged. But that solution will take time, because so many city departments — including DPH, Planning, the Office of Economic Workforce Development, the Office of Small Business, and even the City Attorney — are involved, Morales said. “Hillary’s position is that is an economic crisis in the Mission if we close 50 businesses at the same time,” Morales said. “She’s not for that, regardless of what the law is right now. We need to work together around the immediate reality of the business. And also think long term.” Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletter Email Address Supervisor Hillary Ronen calls the ouster “an economic crisis” for small businesses in the Mission More than 50 massage therapists, acupuncturists and other body workers in the Mission are facing the prospect of losing their office spaces after the San Francisco Department of Public Health notified them in January that their workspaces are illegal.All of them rent offices in ActivSpace, a massive complex at 3150 18th Street near Treat Ave., where entrepreneurs can lease a roughly 100-square-foot office for less than $1,000 a month. However, ActivSpace is zoned only for businesses classified as PDR — production, distribution and repair — and not for personal service-oriented businesses, said Carolina Morales, an aide to District 9 Supervisor Hillary Ronen. last_img read more

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RUGBY League World Cup 2013 has announced the appo

first_imgRUGBY League World Cup 2013 has announced the appointment of Grand Visionary Solutions to lead the initial stage of the official dance programme. The RLWC2013 Dance Programme is supported by Arts Council England and is the key element of a series of cultural events planned around the tournament.Organisers are currently in discussion with various other individuals and bodies to introduce other elements to the wider RLWC2013 culture programme; however dance will be the central part. The culture programme is one of five community initiatives to be delivered by RLWC2013.June Gamble and Gwen Van Spijk of Grand Visionary Solutions have over 45 years combined experience in delivering dance and large scale public engagement projects. Recent projects include leading The Boat Project as part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. They will be working with RLWC2013, Arts Council England, and the host consortiums which will include local sports and arts organisations, as well as dance agencies and dance artists.RLWC2013 Marketing Manager, Mark Foster said: “RLWC2013 will be much more than just an international sporting event and we recognise we have a responsibility to our host communities.Many of our community initiatives will therefore provide life-changing experiences. The opportunity to dance before a RLWC2013 game and in front of a capacity crowd can’t be underestimated as a way of providing inspiration for civic pride in those communities. Details regarding all of RLWC2013 community initiatives will be announced in the near future.”Grand Visionary Solutions’ Gwen van Spijk said: “The RLWC2013 Dance Programme will provide a wonderful opportunity for communities across England, Wales and beyond, to celebrate Dance and make it a key element of the next major sporting event to be held in the UK.”Arts Council England’s Area Executive Director for the North, Sarah Maxfield, said: “The Arts Council is really pleased to be supporting this initiative. London 2012 demonstrated to the world the power of cultural celebrations linked to sport. This project brings that creative spirit to RLWC2013. People living near the host venues will be able to get involved in an exciting dance project with pre-game pitch performances and spectators will also be inspired by a world class dance commission as part of the opening ceremony at the Millennium Stadium.”last_img read more

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Gov Cooper vetoes bill about GenX funding Sen Lee responds

first_imgRALEIGH, NC (WWAY) — Today, Gov. Cooper will veto House Bill 56, An Act to Amend Various Environmental Laws. Gov. Cooper shared the following veto message:“Clean water is critical for our health and our economy and this legislation fails to appropriate any needed funds to the departments in state government charged with setting standards and enforcing laws to prevent illegal chemical discharges into rivers used for drinking water. In addition, it weakens protections from river pollution and landfills and repeals a local plastic bag ban supported by local governments and businesses that was passed to protect the environment.”- Advertisement – Gov. Cooper shared additional thoughts on House Bill 56 in a Medium post:“Clean drinking water is vital to every person and community in North Carolina and stopping threats to our water safety is a top priority for state government.The discovery of the chemical GenX in the Cape Fear River has emphasized that the threat posed by emerging, unregulated compounds will require resources to protect water across the state.Related Article: Craft beer sales deal OK’d by North Carolina Senate panelWhen it comes to drinking water, there is no room for political posturing or hollow solutions. We must keep our eye on the ball to monitor our waterways and ensure that all North Carolinians can have full confidence in the water they drink.The legislation passed by the General Assembly, House Bill 56, provides no resources to the state agencies charged with protecting drinking water and preventing illegal chemicals from being discharged into our rivers. It gives the impression of action while allowing the long-term problem to fester. And it unnecessarily rolls back other environmental protections for landfills, river basins, and our beaches.This cynical legislation fails to address the concerns of families in the Cape Fear region and does nothing to protect drinking water statewide going forward.That is why I am vetoing it.In recent years, state regulators have suffered repeated budget cuts that have left resources stretched thin – nearly 70 positions have been cut from the water quality department of the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) alone since 2013. These cuts are particularly glaring when comparing North Carolina to other states.North Carolina has nine permit writers for 220 water discharge facilities. Meanwhile, South Carolina has almost twice as many officials overseeing far fewer facilities, as does Kentucky.These cuts have forced North Carolina to do more with less, straining state officials’ workload. Still, following reports of GenX in the Cape Fear River, state officials moved swiftly.DEQ successfully took action to stop Chemours from discharging GenX and two additional compounds that were going into the river. DHHS health experts worked with the EPA and DEQ to monitor GenX levels in the Cape Fear and ensure that families could continue to drink their water.As part of the response on GenX, DEQ and DHHS requested $2.6 million to put more experts on the ground – hiring engineers, monitors, permit writers and scientists. Unfortunately, HB 56 offers no support for these agencies. Instead this legislation diverts needed resources to the local utility and UNC-Wilmington and eliminates a local plastic bag ban supported by local governments and businesses that was passed to protect the environment in the Outer Banks.The urgent need to protect our state’s drinking water is not an issue that will soon go away. There are no short cuts, and the presence of GenX in groundwater in Fayetteville makes clear that the solution cannot be limited to Wilmington.This legislation doesn’t fix the problem, and that is why I’m vetoing it. I urge the legislature to take meaningful action to ensure the long-term safety of drinking water in North Carolina.”Senate Republicans responded to the governor’s veto of the legislation in an email.“I am troubled the the governor would place politics ahead of public safety, and prioritize bureaucracy over results,” Sen. Michael Lee said in a statement. “He is now on record for rejecting the only proposal that will actually help clean our drinking water in the lower Cape Fear region.”WWAY’s Hannah Patrick was in Raleigh this morning with a sit down interview with Gov. Cooper. Watch the full report starting tonight WWAY at 5 p.m.last_img read more

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Man finds model boat from Ireland on the beach

first_imgSUNSET BEACH, NC (WWAY) — The distance from the coast of Ireland to Sunset Beach is more than 3000 miles. Despite the long journey, a miniature boat found its way to our shores through the Atlantic. Rex Wray through it was impossible until he discovered Roisin.“The longer I had it, the more interesting it became. It’s really unique as you can see. It was not tattered. Hardly any damage to it whatsoever,” Wray said.- Advertisement – He found the boat early one October morning. He took it back home, cleaned it up and found an e-mail on the boat. Furthermore, the e-mail belonged to Erik Bellamy, the creator of the boat from England.“He gave me a lot of the history on it and I was just stunned. It was unbelievable that such a small object could make it all the way from Ireland to Sunset Beach, North Carolina,” Wray said.Bellamy told him the boat is part of a bigger project, modeled after message in a bottle. It traveled to many location like Canada, the St. Lawrence Seaway  and Little River. Wray says it’s still too hard to believe.Related Article: Interim Sunset Beach mayor appeals DWI conviction“My first instinct was to keep the boat. Put it in like a shadow box and mount it on the wall because it was so interesting and then I felt sorry for Erik Bellamy because he put so much time into this project.”Wray says his job now is to get the boat prepared to sail it back out into the water, to keep the project going.“I feel that it’s Erik’s, it’s his project and you know, keep it going as long as it will go. If it went this far, God only knows how far that can go,” Wray said.This is just one of 20 boats sailed out from 2006 up to now. The boats are completely made out of recycled materials.last_img read more

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Wilmington mother planning vigil for third anniversary of sons death

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) —  Tomorrow marks three years since a 20-year-old was killed in Wilmington.His mother, Jennifer Hatcher, is planning a vigil in his honor where his body was found near Greenfield Lake.- Advertisement – “I just want to keep his name out there until they find out who did this,” said Hatcher.On December 27th, 2017, 20-year-old Dillon Morris’s body was found in a ravine along East Lake Shore Drive.Morris had been shot to death, but three years later, the culprit still hasn’t been found.Related Article: Florence death toll climbs to 37“Knowing that they would pay for what they did to my son. No, it’s not going to bring him back but it’d be closure for me,” said Hatcher.Hatcher has mourned the loss of her son for three years and recently, a new wound has opened up, after she lost her other child, her daughter, just three months ago.“I’ve had a lot of support, especially from my kids’ best friends and my family, all my family’s from South Carolina, I have no family here, except for the few that was really close to my daughter and my son,” said Hatcher.Hatcher still visits the tree where her son was found often.She doesn’t want to leave Wilmington until she gets answers about what happened.“We been here eleven years. This is where they grew up at to me, but I’m dying here, I don’t want to leave. Especially this tree, it’s special to me, right in front of it where he laid and died,” said Hatcher.So she’s holding a vigil at the tree, so her son can be remembered.“He was outgoing, he loved everybody. He was special, he was my baby,” said Hatcher.The vigil is tomorrow at 5:30 p.m. along East Lake Shore Drive at the bridge between Lake Branch Drive and South 11th Street.For more on other cases like Dillon’s, tune into Good Morning Carolina on Monday mornings for our Unsolved series or go to https://wwaytv3.com/unsolved.last_img read more

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ILM seeing flight delays due to winter weather

first_imgRelated Article: ILM set new passenger record in 2018 American Airlines jets on the runway at Wilmington International Airport. (Photo: WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — While it might not be snowing in New Hanover County yet this afternoon, the winter weather elsewhere is affecting flights at Wilmington International Airport.As of now, the 2:05 p.m. American Airlines flight to Charlotte is canceled.- Advertisement – Many other flights to and from Charlotte are delayed. Some Atlanta flights are also seeing delays.If you’re heading to the airport, make sure you check your flight’s status to see if the weather has impacted it.last_img

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Migrants are at the centre of the Churchs heart

first_imgWhatsApp SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>center_img Il-Papa Franġisku flimkien ma’ emigranti fiċ-ċentru tal-Caritas fil-MarokkIl-Papa Franġisku flimkien ma’ emigranti fiċ-ċentru tal-Caritas fil-Marokk Pope Francis addressed the ongoing phenomenon of mass migration on Saturday, during a meeting with migrants at the diocesan Caritas centre in Rabat, Morocco.The Pope said the encounter gave him “the chance once more to express my closeness to all of you, and together with you to discuss a great and deep wound that continues to afflict our world at the beginning of this twenty-first century. A wound that cries out to heaven”.In his address, Pope Francis spoke about the Global Compact, adopted at an Intergovernmental Conference held in Marrakech in December 2018. He stressed the importance of the document as “an important step forward for the international community”, saying the Compact helps us see that “it is not just about migrants”, but about the face we want to give our society, and about the value of human life”.At the centre of the Church’s heartSpeaking directly to the migrants present, the Holy Father said, “You are not the marginalized; you are at the centre of the Church’s heart”.Pope Francis suggested four words – welcoming, protecting, promoting, and integrating – which he said, “can help us find shared strategies to create… spaces for conferring dignity”. These four words “form a frame of reference for us all”, he said. “For we are all involved in this effort… and all of us are needed in the work of building a more dignified, safe, and fraternal life”.Every person has a right to the future Concluding his address, Pope Francis once again addressed migrants directly. “Dear migrant friends, the Church is aware of the sufferings that accompany your journey, and she suffers with you”, he said. “Every human being has the right to life”, the Pope insisted, “every person has the right to dream and to find his or her rightful place in our ‘common home’!”“Every person has a right to the future”.last_img read more

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Trash found littering ocean floor in deepestever sub dive

first_img1 of 7 The Skaff lander floats next to the research vessel DSSV Pressure Drop above the Pacific Oceans’s Mariana Trench in an undated photo released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel/Reeve Jolliffe/Handout via REUTERS. SharePrint The submarine DSV Limiting Factor is tethered to a crane from the research vessel DSSV Pressure Drop above the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench in an undated photo released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel/Tamara Stubbs/Handout via REUTERS. An object described by a spokesperson for the Five Deeps Mariana expedition as “manmade” is illuminated at top right by the light of the submarine DSV Limiting Factor on the floor of the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench, in an undated still image from video released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel/Handout via REUTERS. On the deepest dive ever made by a human inside a submarine, a Texas investor and explorer found something he could have found in the gutter of nearly any street in the world: trash.Victor Vescovo, a retired naval officer, said he made the unsettling discovery as he descended nearly 6.8 miles (35,853 feet/10,928 meters) to a point in the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench that is the deepest place on Earth. His dive went 52 feet (16 meters) lower than the previous deepest descent in the trench in 1960.Vescovo found undiscovered species as he visited places no human had gone before. On one occasion he spent four hours on the floor of the trench, viewing sea life ranging from shrimp-like anthropods with long legs and antennae to translucent “sea pigs” similar to a sea cucumber.He also saw angular metal or plastic objects, one with writing on it.“It was very disappointing to see obvious human contamination of the deepest point in the ocean,” Vescovo said in an interview.Plastic waste has reached epidemic proportions in the world’s oceans with an estimated 100 million tonnes dumped there to date, according to the United Nations. Scientists have found large amounts of micro plastic in the guts of deep-dwelling ocean mammals like whales.RAISE AWARENESSVescovo hoped his discovery of trash in the Mariana Trench would raise awareness about dumping in the oceans and pressure governments to better enforce existing regulations, or put new ones in place.“It’s not a big garbage collection pool, even though it’s treated as such,” Vescovo said of the worlds’ oceans.In the last three weeks, the expedition has made four dives in the Mariana Trench in his submarine, “DSV Limiting Factor,” collecting biological and rock samples.It was the third time humans have dived to the deepest point in the ocean, known as Challenger Deep. Canadian movie maker James Cameron was the last to visit in 2012 in his submarine, reaching a depth of 35,787 feet (10,908 meters).Prior to Cameron’s dive, the first-ever expedition to Challenger Deep was made by the U.S. Navy in 1960, reaching a depth of 10,912 meters.WhatsApp The submarine DSV Limiting Factor floats near the research vessel DSSV Pressure Drop above the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench in an undated photo released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel/Tamara Stubbs/Handout via REUTERS. Undersea explorer Victor Vescovo pilots the submarine DSV Limiting Factor in the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench in an undated still image from video released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel/Handout via REUTERS. Sea creatures swim around a part of a submersible lander, illuminated by the light of the submarine DSV Limiting Factor on the floor of the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench in an undated still image from video released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Discovery Channel/Handout via REUTERS. A technician checks the submarine DSV Limiting Factor aboard the research vessel DSSV Pressure Drop above the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench in an undated photo released by the Discovery Channel May 13, 2019. Atlantic Productions for Discovery Channel/Tamara Stubbs/Handout via REUTERS. <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more