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Hickling, Nedrick win medals at Junior Pan Am

first_imgTissana Hickling and Kevin Nedrick won medals for Jamaica on yesterday’s opening day of the Junior Pan Am Championships in Trujillo, Peru. Hickling picked up silver in the girls’ long jump after finishing second with 6.36m metres. America Tara Davis picked up gold with 6.51m while Tyra Gittens of Trinidad and Tobago was third with 6.22m. Nedrick was third in the boys discus with a throw of 58.86m. Claudio Romero of Chile won with an impressive mark of 62.09m while Turner Washington of the United States was second with 61.30m. It was tough for Jamaica on the track. Amoi Brown clocked 13.52 seconds for fourth and Janeek Brown 13.99 for eighth in the 100m hurdles. The event was won by Tia Jones of the United States in 13.01 with her compatriot Tara Davis, second in 13.05. In the 110m hurdles, Carifta U-20 champion Damon Thomas was fourth in 13.59 while teammate Philip Lemonious finished sixth in 13.69. American Eric Edwards Sr won the event in 13.33. Aneka Brissett was fifth in the girls’ 100m in 11.78 as Trinidad and Tobago’s Khalifa St Fort won gold after clocking 11.32 relegating the American duo of Rebekkah Smith and Symone Mason to second and third in 11.55 and 11.62 respectively. In another track final Jamal Walton of the Cayman Islands captured the 400m in 44.99 with Anthony Carpenter of Jamaica, fourth in 46.92. The outstanding Christopher Taylor will be in action for Jamaica today in the semi-finals of the boys’ 200m.last_img read more

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CPA has no established criteria for child placement

first_imgThe Childcare and Protection Agency (CPA) has no established criteria to determine which facility children are placed in once they areThe Childcare and Protection Agency officetaken into the State’s care, a recently released ChildLink report has revealed.The report “An Analysis of the Nature and Extent of Institutionalization of Children in Guyana” stated that the agency reported that based on “informal determination” of the facilities’ strengths as well as the care facilities’ preferences with regards to age and sex, a child is placed.However, it highlighted that the consultants at the agency were not in an informed position to indicate clearly where, for instance, an abused child−whether physical, sexual, neglected or otherwise−would be placed, as against a child whose family could not adequately provide food and shelter for them.The report questioned, based on this revelation, the type of criteria being used to place children in foster care.As of March 2016, the CPA recorded that 803 children were in alternative care (foster and residential), of which 624 of these children are in residential care while 179 are in foster care. These children were placed in alternative care because of various forms of abuse, poverty, disasters, disability of a parent, and the death of a parent.Child Counsellor Abbigale Loncke had stated that Guyana does not have separate facilities to cater for children who have either been abused or taken in because of wandering or poverty. She stated that while children enter alternative care for various reasons, they are all put in one type of facility − there is no distinctive facility.In Guyana efforts have been made to strengthen the legislative framework of the childcare and protection sector. During 2007 to 2011, a number of legislations were presented in Parliament, however a bill which addresses alternative family-based care remains inconclusive.During the period 2010 to 2015, the ChildLinK in collaboration with the agency, UNICEF, EU and Family for Every Child implemented the Foster Care initiative which led to developing the Kinship Care Initiative (KCI) and subsequently the Alternative Care Initiative (ACI). But its final position is uncertain. The bill is yet to be presented in the House.The report indicated that while the CPA continues to manage the foster care service, records show that the number of children being institutionalised has grown over a ten-year period by almost 50 per cent.Additionally, it stated that caregivers were not considerate with respect to the circumstances faced by a child, which gave rise to their admission to the facility before the placement was made.“Rather they were informed that the child would be assigned there and the facility was required to make the necessary arrangements for his or her admission,” it said, adding that this posed many challenges, since the caregivers did not know what to expect and therefore were unprepared for the circumstances presented by each child.“Some form of dialogue is, therefore, necessary between the residential facility and CPA before a child’s admission so that an informed response based on the particular needs of the child could be provided,” the report recommended.last_img read more

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Driftwood to kick-off 2017 National 7s Series

first_imgThe Series will then take a one month break that has been necessitated by the country’s General Elections in August before resuming September 2 with the Prinsloo Sevens in Nakuru.The fourth leg of the series that is yet to be confirmed takes place on September 9 with the last two legs, the Christie Sevens in Nairobi and the Dala Sevens in Kisumu taking place on the weekend of September 23 and 30 respectively.The Kenya Rugby Union has in the meantime invited its affiliate clubs to place their bids for the fourth round of the series.2017 National Sevens Series datesRound 1: Driftwood Sevens, Mombasa – 22nd/23rd JulyRound 2: Kabeberi Sevens, Nairobi – 29th/30th JulyBREAKRound 3: Prinsloo Sevens, Nakuru – 2nd/3rd SeptemberRound 4: To be confirmed   – 9th/10th SeptemberRound 5: Christie Sevens, Nairobi – 23rd/24rd SeptemberRound 6: Dala Sevens, Kisumu – 30th September/ 1st October0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Former Prime minister Raila Amolo Odinga presenting the Dala 7s trophy to Main Cup champions Homeboyz. PHOTO/KRUNAIROBI, Kenya, March 1 – Unlike its tradition, Mombasa’s Driftwood Sevens will get the 2017 Kenya Rugby Union National Sevens Series underway on the weekend of July 22. It will be followed by the Mwangi Kabeberi leg which usually opens the series but this time the Mwamba RFC organised tournament will be held on the weekend of July 29 at the Nairobi Railways Club.last_img read more

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Derby 1-2 Nottingham Forest: Tricky Trees come from behind to secure victory

first_img Nottingham Forest 1 Nottingham Forest came from behind to beat East Midlands rivals Derby 2-1 at the iPro Stadium.Ben Osborn’s injury-time effort handed Stuart Pearce’s side all three points as the Tricky Trees picked up their first victory since November 22.Henri Lansbury’s first-half own-goal gave the home side the lead after just 16 minutes, but Britt Assombalonga equalised after 75 minutes.But Osborn’s first goal for Forest saw the away side pick up the victory.The result hands Pearce, who has come under pressure in recent weeks, some breathing room at the City Ground.last_img

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Celta Vigo 2-1 Granada: Ex-Liverpool striker continues good form

first_img Iago Aspas: The former Liverpool forward hit a double to help his side to victory 1 In-form Iago Aspas took his tally for the season to 18 goals with a fine double as Celta Vigo moved to fifth in La Liga with a 2-1 victory over Granada. Live on talkSPORT2, the former Liverpool man put the home side ahead from the spot before Youssef El-Arabi hit back in the second half to draw Granada level. Aspas doubled his tally with 14 minutes left on the clock, as Celta overtake Athletic Bilbao in the league standings. Granada, meanwhile, remain in 17th with just three wins in their last ten. You can listen to live La Liga commentary on talkSPORT 2. For details of how to retune your radio, click here.last_img

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MAN’S ATTEMPT TO LURE WOMAN TO ISLAND LIFE LEFT ALL AT SEA

first_imgA man’s search for a female companion to join him for a year on an isolated island off the Donegal coast has failed.John McManus, 36, advertised for a “wife/companion” who would accompany him to the island of Inishfree in January.McManus, from Leitrim, wanted the woman to spend the next 12 months with him while he lived off the land and wrote a book about his time. McManus was inspired by Gerald Kingsland, whose island adventures with a partner found via an ad were chronicled in the 1980s book and film ‘Castaway.’It was later reported that McManus had been involved in a scheme in which he offered to impregnate women for their husbands.The unemployed hotel worker offered his services in hotel sex sessions and had once advertised himself as a faith healer and as a “wizard seeking witches to join my coven.”McManus’s ad attracted thousands of queries from curious parties. But just before Christmas, he admitted defeat in his search for an island companion, saying he could not find anyone suitable who could commit for a full year and that he wasn’t planning to go alone.  MAN’S ATTEMPT TO LURE WOMAN TO ISLAND LIFE LEFT ALL AT SEA was last modified: January 1st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:companiondonegalInishfreeJohn McManuslast_img read more

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Night of the living comics

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PICO RIVERA – A masked wrestler/detective hugs his long-lost love in an acrylic painting gracing one wall at the Pico Rivera Centre for the Arts. Nearby, the tortured face of “El Muerto, the Aztec Zombie,” peers out from another painting. A lot is going on in “Comics!,” a new exhibition celebrating independent comic books and the artists who create them. “It’s a way for the community to see there are comic book artists from their very own town, and that it’s also art, as legitimate as any style,” said Javier Henandez of Whittier, who created the “El Muerto” series. Two other Whittier comic book artists also are featured in the show – Rafael Navarro, creator of “Sonambulo,” the wrestler detective, and Will Caulfield, whose superhero Bat-Bat is a regular working guy by day. Others artists include Jerrell Conner, Louis and Gary Gallegos, Rhode Montijo, Bernyce Talley and Michael Aushenker. Carmela Garcia, the art center’s coordinator, came up with the idea for an exhibition on comic books, which she considers an exciting art form. “They are important and unique because they tell American stories,” she said. “And the artists I know keep getting better all the time.” To make the display happen, she called on Hernandez, who was immediately responsive. “It’s a great way for the community, for kids, to see the works of local comic book artists,” he said. “I threw myself into finding artists to fill up the center.” Navarro said being tapped for the show was an honor. “We are pioneers in this independent comic book field, and it’s great for us to represent the city of Whittier,” he said. debbie.pfeiffer@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3028last_img read more

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For the record

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! An editorial Tuesday incorrectly identified the winner of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s 2005 Science Bowl. Venice High School won last year.last_img read more

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Rare cancer unites local mothers

first_imgIt was just an afternoon stop at a Del Taco drive-through when Lori Tucker got the first sign of things to come. She turned to the back seat to hand 19-month-old Trinity her drink and noticed her daughter’s left eye was crossed and moving around. Tucker reached back and covered Trinity’s right eye with her hand, saying, “Look at me, baby. Look at me.” But Trinity’s left eye rolled up and down and side to side. “I knew she couldn’t see me.” With a doctor’s referral a few days later, Tucker took her daughter to a pediatric opthamologist, who took one look and ordered Tucker to drive immediately to Childrens Hospital Los Angeles in Hollywood. Some 250 children in the Unites States and Canada are diagnosed with retinoblastoma each year. There are roughly 11 cases per million children under 5. There are about 115,000 children under age 5 in the entire San Fernando Valley, yet Tucker has found at least seven others in the Valley’s far west end who have been diagnosed with the disease – far more than statistics would predict. And she’s begun networking with their moms. They call themselves the West Valley Retinoblastoma Club. It’s an informal group with no meetings or agendas. It’s just a half-dozen moms who lean on each other and understand a world of MRIs, prosthetic eyes and chemotherapy that most people hope never to share. “A lot of people don’t get it. They kind of freak out on you, `Oh my God, your kid has cancer,’ and you think, `Now I have to counsel you?”‘ said Cindy Mays, a Woodland Hills mom whose daughter Sullivan, now almost 3, was diagnosed with retinoblastoma at 4 months. “But with these women, you all have gone through this horrific experience. I feel like I could just call up these people and just say the worst things. The things we talk about you can’t talk about with other people.” Friends for life “I know I’m going to be friends with these women for the rest my life,” said Mays. The women of the club have gone to Disneyland together, met at the park, shared hospital war stories. Together they’ve tried to understand how such a rare cancer has touched so many lives in the West Valley. They worry there could be a cancer cluster in the community and that, somehow, their children’s illnesses could be linked to Santa Susana Field Lab – the former nuclear research and rocket engine test facility in the hills a few miles away. Earlier this year, two studies paid for by the federal government found slightly higher rates of cancer among residents who had lived within two miles of the lab between 1996 and 2003. Since then, the women have talked to the researcher, Dr. Hal Morgenstern, who is chairman of the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He has few answers for the mothers, who have counted eight children with retinoblastoma in the West Valley. “It’s definitely worthy of investigating,” he said earlier this summer. “We need to confirm the actual cases in a well-defined period and well-defined population to ascertain whether there’s any possible connection with Rocketdyne or anything else.” Murphree has treated all the children diagnosed with retinoblastoma in the West Valley and has heard the moms’ concerns. His team is one of two that treat all retinoblastoma cases in the western United States, and he warns patients that it’s difficult to figure out if there are higher rates of the disease in certain areas. “The problem always with retinoblastoma is that when you’re dealing with a very rare cancer like this, a few cases can seem like a cluster when it’s just a random distribution.” For Trinity, the tumor had grown so large inside her left eye that she could no longer see. The toddler would have to lose her eye. The day after Murphee diagnosed her, mom and daughter were in the hospital waiting room for her first eye exam, which must be done under anesthetic. Sitting nearby, Cindy Mays could see Trinity’s eye and recognized the signs of retinoblastoma. Only a few months earlier, Mays had pushed her pediatrician to take a second, closer look at her own baby daughter’s lazy eye. Four hours after the second exam, Mays was sitting in Murphree’s Hollywood office planning chemotherapy. Because they caught the tumor early and began treatment quickly, Sullivan was able to keep her eye. But at the hospital, Mays could see Tucker was upset and struggling with the diagnosis. She knew she’d seen her in their Woodland Hills neighborhood, so she introduced herself and got her phone number. That night, Mays had dinner from a local pizza kitchen delivered to the family’s house. “I knew we’d be becoming friends because when you have a child like this you tend to cling on to people who are in the same situation,” Mays said. Because Trinity’s cancer had reached the optic nerve, which increases the chance it will spread to the brain, the doctors decided to give her aggressive chemotherapy designed for a brain tumor. Trinity spent 73 days at Childrens Hospital over the next five months. In pain and shock from the treatment, she thrashed in her hospital bed and yanked out the intravenous lines, spraying blood in the room and on her mother. After those episodes, Tucker would stand in the hallway, crying and talking on her cell phone to Mays. “She’d already been through it,” Tucker said. “She was able to say the right things.” A few months later, Tucker’s husband, Dean, was chatting with another father at a middle school orientation for his son who was entering sixth grade. Talk turned to family, and the men discovered they both had babies with retinoblastoma. Cindy and Glenn Braggs’ son Solomon had just had his eye removed the month before. “This is supposed to be this really rare disease, and we just met each other at the school,” said Cindy Braggs, who became fast friends with Lori Tucker and Cindy Mays. Within a few weeks their children were attending birthday parties at the Tuckers’ house. Solomon was diagnosed after his mother noticed a white glow in the boy’s right eye when he was about 6 months. Glint in his eye Two months later she took him to the pediatrician for a rash and asked her to check the glint in his eye. Right away the doctor saw the tumor and sent Braggs to a specialist who confirmed retinoblastoma. “Everything went upside down at that point,” Braggs recalled. “It was like getting hit by a tidal wave. We went under.” In Solomon’s case, even though he still could see out of his right eye, there was a risk the cancer could recur if he kept it. “That was a really tough decision, but you have to make a decision for your baby’s eye. I’m a singer, but I’ve always thought I’d rather lose my hearing than my sight,” said Braggs, a member of the group En Vogue. “My heart breaks every day at some point when I think about it.” But Braggs can lean on the other moms in “the club.” They try to meet every few weeks to talk and pray. Today, Solomon and Trinity have prosthetic eyes, which are like thick white, Lucite contact lenses with hand-painted irises – bright blue for Trinity and brown for Solomon, both with little flecks of colors and highlights, just like a real eye. Sometimes the children pop their plastic eyes out, and the moms share horror stories – like the little boy who lost his prosthetic eye in the ball pit at Chuck E. Cheese. Nearly 3 years old and growing fast, Trinity’s eye socket will soon outgrow her first prosthetic eye, so her oculist, Stephen Haddad, recently fit her for a new one. With her prosthetic out while the doctor works on it, Trinity’s left eye is a pink hole. But she shows no self-consciousness as she runs through Haddad’s office telling visitors, “C’mon, c’mon, let’s go look at my eye.” Tucker said being around other children who have retinoblastoma and have lost their eyes has helped Trinity adjust. “It is such a rare cancer, and so you don’t find many people who are going through the same thing,” she said. “But she knows she’s not alone.” And that is an even greater comfort for the moms of the West Valley Retinoblastoma Club. “My kids ask, `Why did Solomon get cancer?’ I can’t say why, but God can always make something great of it,” Braggs said. “I hope that one day our kids band together and become this group that speaks out and becomes a really awesome voice for this disease. We will make something positive.” kerry.cavanaugh@dailynews.com (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los Angeles“I said to the doctor, `I’ve got to pick my kids up from school, can’t we go tomorrow?’ And the doctor said, `No, you’re going today.’ “My heart dropped when she said that. That’s when I knew something was really wrong.” Within a few hours, Tucker and Trinity were in the office of Dr. A. Linn Murphree, the hospital’s director of ocular oncology. He dimmed the lights, peered into Trinity’s pupil and knew what he was looking at. Retinoblastoma. The rare, fast-growing eye cancer is found in children under 5 and can begin growing while the child is still in the womb. Often it isn’t detected until it has grown so large that the eye must be removed. last_img